Forgot password? | Forgot username?

HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES

HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES




Click on forum for overview #antiNWO_OPS 2008-2022
2 parts line link please click on forum

http://supporters-desk.com/ Board link: Forum





Real CLIMA HOAX is a NWO OVERTAKE TOOL
And a criminal act against mankind to steal freedom make energie more EXPENSIVE

Seen in the hairraising discussion about co2
what is food for plants but these zionists satanists really want to make the planet into Mars by STEALING plants food instead of talking about sox co3 co4 WHATEVER.
Arrest all execute all

https://rumble.com/embed/v1ahmod/?pub=4

More on http://SUPPORTERS-DESK.com as part of the greatest hidden infowars frontline Information network of the world

http://sdecbs.net Go home and learn..











REST IN PEACE
LITTLE BUMBLEBEE
I TRIED TO SAVE FOR 3 DAYS

https://www.facebook.com/NEWSAGENCYEURO … 9743870566

OBVIOUSLY A NATURAL DEAD!?!?







Remember; the new name for MONSANTO is "BAYER" [who invented and trademarked 'heroin']. After being found out for developing a nicotine-based pesticide which killed billions of bees, we now all of a sudden have "bee-eating hornets" in Britain. I wonder how they flew all those hundreds of miles from another country?

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=25 … 5982745970


#htotchem datapool ZIONIST NWO UN AGENDA 2030 CRIME
C H E M T R A I L S

http://chemtrail-disclosure.blogspot.com

#htotchem ALUMINIUM NANOPARTICLES

#htottt5g 5G ACTIVATION shredd your inner cells flu like symptoms

http://my5gkill.com



#htotchen

Bumblebee hostet for 3 days after found in the Garden surrounded by ants. obviously
end of her (female) life.


https://www.bitchute.com/video/cbvYKmQKhWfv/

Try to save with mineralwater and honey tried to communicate with fingers the insect react.
So I was part of the insect community for 3 days.

Imagine blowing trees with thousands of bees with little bumping hearts what a incident!?!

Bumblebee only girls has got a sting. Todays 13 races. Middleage was 60.

Bumblebees are wild bees and work 20 times higher than normal bees even start in february by 2 ° Celsius.
That Works they live underground in groups of 50-600 insects.

More on
http://supporters-desk.com/ Board link: Topic



.
#savethebees



OLDEST GREAT BEE RACE REDISCOVERED IN INDONESIA

https://www.freethink.com/environment/w … BARGeOkQoo










OK I ADMIRE BUMBLEBEES A LIFETIME
FOR THEIR HEAVY WORK THEY DO
20 TIMES HIGHER THAN BEES IN GENERAL

https://www.facebook.com/NEWSAGENCYEURO … 743870566/

MIDDLE AGE THERE WERE 60 DIFFERENCRENT RACES
TODAY ONLY 13

THEY START WORKING FIRST INSECTS IN FEBRUARY
WITH 2 DEGREES CELSIUS IMAGINE THAT


SO NATURAL BEES WE HAVE 500 DIFFERENT RACES
INDONESIAN DISCOVERY BIGGEST ONE VERY OLD






































Aha impact crater, great. Could be even the prehistoric nuclear war rubbed the giants creators of the great pyramid 55.000 BCE out!?!? #misnicism

https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidbress … 676c9b62a4

https://newsinstact.com/articles/liquid … Mx-xciIjb0

http://misnicism.com

http://misnic.com

Forget the past 10.000 years Mason rigged nonsense.
Mankinds history is about 2.000.000 years.
Thats why their #EVILPHARAOEMPIRE organized terror today. Real Heavy since #enlightenment2012 .

https://newstangail24.com/sphinx-of-giz … xQY3m5xIaM

Presented by the greatest hidden infowars frontline Information network

http://sdecbs.net
http://EARTH-COLONIES-BROADCASTING-SERVICE.NET




Guess what YOUTUBE is Google is ILLUMINATI is Club 300, Boss QUEEN ELISABETH 2 NWO Mason Bilderberger TALMUD-ORDER nazijew Mafia


#SD_ECBS_SERVERS #SD_ECBS_SERVER #SD_ECBS_DISCLOSURELOBBY #enlightenment2012 #earthoptimization #misnicism UFO SPACEGODS CREATION DISCLOSURE THATS WHY THE EVILPHARAOEMPIRE NAZIJEW NWO MASON BILDERBGER TALMUDORDER ILLUMINATI FUCKERS SPRAYED CORONA COV ID 19 GEORGIA GUIDESTONE BOMBING

https://www.facebook.com/OCCUPY1stAnnun … 0310048758




MOST IMPORTANT EARTH ACTIVITY BLOCKED BY ILLUMINATI FACEBOOK

NO MATTER NWO BILDERBERGER CERN NAZIJEW FUCKERS RESPONSIBLE

ALIEN IMPACT FOR WIPING OUT MANKIND
(NOT SO REAL, THEY MADE US)

https://solen.info/solar






Brainiacvirus all disappeared in the ILLUMINATI CONTROLLED INTERNET

http://my5Gkill.com

FUCK THE NWO!! THEY ARE THE #CORONASPRAYERS

https://www.google.com/search?q=hightow … e&ie=UTF-8



WORLDS MOST IMPORTANT EXPERT IN THE CORONA COV ID 19 ANALYSIS
MASKS DONT WORK AND ITS 5G RELATED

https://rumble.com/vcna7x-dr.-judy-miko … cines.html

THE GLOBALIZATION IS A COMPLETE TAKEOVER AND ENSLAVERY OF MANKIND!!! COV ID19 HAPPEND BECAUSE THE DEEPSTATE EVILPHARAOEMPIRE FOLKS LOOSE THEIR POWER UNDER TRUMP, THE #riggedSYSTEM THEY INSTALLED IN 1776 WITH THEIR MASON #riggedCONSTITUTION AND THE USA AS UK SLAVESTATE STILL UP TODAY #freetheUSA1776.
SO YOU SEE WHY ALL THESE SUPERCRIMINALS LIKE CLINTONS, BUSH, OBAMA, PODESTA, KERRY, SORRO ARE STILL FREE!!!!!


Since autum 2019 the world is under attack by a evil planned CONSPIRACY no matter if its ILLUMINATI NEW DEEPSTATE CHINA or good old ILLUMINATI US DEEPSTATE and a WORLD EMERGENCY!!! #htotcoron #htottt5G noone calls for military action against this!?! #riggedSYSTEM #CATCHTHEMSHREDDTHEM

While you all divide, attack, rumble the NWO KILLS by its Pfizer biontech mRNA hiv mutant VACCINATIONS in millions. Yeh garanteed in all this NWO CREATED chaos NWO-Biden voters never understand Trump onlyone can stop this!!!
#htottpfm datapool US ELECTIONS FRAUD
#htotcoronm datapool Corona cov id19

Under NWO Biden the West, USA, everything got TERMINATED for the new ILLUMINATI DEEPSTATE China the US deepstate clowns fummeled under UK QE2 order in 100 years that easy. As long all got the Pfizer mrnavaxx not important anyway, they all are out and offline bitcoin mutants.. #htotcoronm #htotbid #htotchin

PRESIDENT TRUMP IS MISLEADED ABOUT DANGER OF COV id 19

The mRNA vaccinations
The Eco LOCKDOWNS
And now western christian nations
Will loose its medical System DOCTORS Personal
If these got vaccinated with the Pfizer shit.
Rescue medication NR 1 IS ASPERINE  AGAINST TROMBOSIS IN LUNGS LEGS WHATEVER NO MATTER IF THESE 5G PHONES RELATED OR COV ID 19
IVECMERTINE EVEN HEAL IN ALL STAGES.
100 PROTECTION TO FIND IN CHINESE GALGANT GINGER INDONESIAN UNIVERSITY STUDIES

#htotcoron #htotcoronm datapool
PROOF OF PANDEMIC HOAX

https://facebook.com/story.php?story_fb … 1550556217

#htotcoron datapool PLANDEMIC GENOCIDE
Open introduction for full information service NEWS 2022 05-11
NWO ILLUMINATI ARE ON FULL DESTRUCTION OF US MILITARY WITH VACCINATIONS 70% DESTROYED
AS ZIONIST NWO UN AGENDA 2030
I MEAN EVERYONE OF THE INTERNET KNEW SINCE OVER 2 YEARS THE STUFF KILLS!!!! WHY THE FUCK THE US MILITARY VAXX THEIR OWN TROOPS?!?! PROOF OF EVIL NAZIJEW RIGGED PENTAGON THE KILL ORDER OF OWN TROOPS BECAUSE ON OTHERS CORNERS OF THE GLOBE OTHERR ZIONISTS CREATE A UCRAINE WAR SCENARIO (ZELINSKJY BILDERBERGER ECOFORUM MEMBER MASS MURDER NOW #WORLDWARMAKERS )

2021 US VAXX DAMAGED IN 2021 1100%
2022 US MILITARY VAXX DAMAGE POSSIBLE 5000% in 2022
Since autum 2019 the world is under attack by a evil planned CONSPIRACY no matter if its ILLUMINATI NEW DEEPSTATE CHINA or good old ILLUMINATI US DEEPSTATE and a WORLD EMERGENCY!!! #htotcoron #htottt5G noone calls for military action against this!?! #riggedSYSTEM #CATCHTHEMSHREDDTHEM
While you all divide, attack, rumble the NWO KILLS by its Pfizer biontech mRNA hiv mutant VACCINATIONS in millions. Yeh garanteed in all this NWO CREATED chaos NWO-Biden voters never understand Trump onlyone can stop this!!!


https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 0953680093

https://gab.com/Analyst2021/posts/108283972041598797

https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 9085650002

https://gab.com/Analyst2021/posts/107180314529261166

https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 8444218329

#htotcoronMV datapool PLANDEMIC GENOCIDE DISCLOSURE mastervideos

WORLDS BEST COVID DISCLOSURE
bitchute.com/video/K1ZErvirC5w4

GREAT FUN AGAINST TRUMP THE #CORONASPRAYERS DEM LIBS
ABOUT THEIR OWN KILL CAMPAIGN HAHA DONT VAXX!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYJrFcQTTOI

BUT HACKED IN BIDEN PUSH THE KILL VAXX AFTER
https://www.bitchute.com/video/IJDk0DRKnAh0

OK I DONT COME CLEAR WITH THIS:
https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 0063933914

https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 7574965282

https://t.me/newsagencyeurope/3800

https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 2362402012

https://gab.com/Analyst2021/posts/106310162572937689

https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 3379237628

https://gab.com/groups/19661

https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed/posts/ … 3069500327


AFTER ANTHRAX VAXX SCANDAL HOW IS THIS POSSIBLE?!?!

THESE PEOPLE WILL ALL DIE AS EVIL NWO UN AGENDA 2030 ATTACK
AND DONT THEY HAVE EXPERTS FOR BIOWEAPONS (THE US DEEPSTATE FUCKERS EVEN SELF CREATED)
https://gab.com/Analyst2021/posts/107047551788923588

TO PREVENT ANY KILLS OF US MILITARY PERSONAL LIKE THIS?!?!?!
https://gab.com/Analyst2021/posts/107209067702597609

https://gab.com/Analyst2021/posts/107213871744183789

http://mycoronakill.com
http://my5Gkill.com
http://newsagencyeurope.com
https://gab.com/SD_ECBS_newsfeed
http://supporters-desk.com

presented by the greatest hidden infowars frontline network
http://sdecbs.net
http://EARTH-COLONIES-BROADCASTING-SERVICE.NET

AGAINST THE WORLD GENOCIDE
#NWO_OPS COV ID 19 DEPOPULATION OPERATION

http://supporters-desk.com/ Board link: Topic


QUEEN ELISABETHS II OF ENGLAND OWNER OF THE USA AS UK SLAVESTATE SINCE 1776 WITH HIS CIA CLOWN FUCKBLOCK ZUCKFUCK
US COURT SENATE HEARING ABOUT INTERNET MANIPULATION BLOCKADE #truthblockade #freeinformationact is a human right,asshole

https://www.bitchute.com/video/umA2arBT2rIs

FACEBOOKS REALITY AS CIA SPYTOOL RIGGING THE INTERNET LIVE

https://www.bitchute.com/video/7TpP81gwNwJd



This info is presented by worlds greatest hidden infowar frontline network
creators of President Trump and the NWO SHREDD under the lead of the gods

THE INTERNET CREATED BY SOMEONE MORE INTELLIGENT THAN YOU ARE
presented by the
SD_ECBS SERVERS SWITCHBOARD OVERVIEW

https://earth-colonies-broadcasting-service.net



I AM THE DESK
THE SUPPORTERS-DESK OF THE GODS

http://supporters-desk.com/index.php?op … &Itemid=28


DONATION FOR THE WORLDS GREATEST PRIVATE INFORMATION NETWORK PROGRAMMED
2007-2022 YOU CAN SEND VIA PAYPAL.COM ON

gern_geschehn@gmx.de


So and so it is database for everyone who know where someting is to find if they needed and thats the intension of it. People can learn people can repost and find new stuff. I think you will enjoy it one day. I'm 57 years old and work 30 years on profession television  and have my 20 years of knowledge out of the frontline of the infowars.

Yours Allda Ben Marius de Bruycker
SD_ECBS CEO United Artists for Earthoptimization
nonprofit and for free instant enlightenment informing machine
NETWORK ON THE FRONTLINE INFOWAR CONCERNING THE
NONINFORMATIONCAMPAIGN about the ALIEN AGENDA, SPACEGODS CREATIONISM THINGS MAKING OUR WORLDS BETTER IN ORDER OF HIGHER RANKS SO SPACEGODS powered by the  SUPPORTERS-DESK of the E.C.B.S.



BAN AND BLOCK GAIA PSEUDO KNOWLEDGE SUCKERS
THEY TRY TO OVERTAKE MANKINDS HISTORY AS CORPORATE OWNER
MEANS BACK TO THE MASON TALMUDORDER ILLUMINATI NAZIJEW FUCKER SOCIOPATHS

THE SICK MASON BILDERBERGER TALMUD-ORDER NAZIJEW MAFIA THINK THEY CAN OVERTAKE MOTHER EARTH PARADISE PLANET AGAINST THE CREATORS LET THIS SINK IN !!!!!
PROOF OF 100% REFLEXED REALITY BRAINDAMAGED BLOODLINE!!!
THE LAST DOING LIKE THIS WAS SHREDDED INTO PIECES AND PUT INTO A TROUGH OF TAR UNDER A BIG PYRAMIDE MEANS YOU GOT TOAST YOU ASSCLOWNS!!!!!!!!!








SD_ECBS                                http://SDECBS.NET
AGENCY for NETWORKING ON THE FRONTLINES powered by the
SUPPORTERS-DESK of the EARTH COLONIES BROADCASTING SERVICE
INSTANT ENLIGHTENMENT INFORMING MACHINE
Guerrilla warfare INFOWARS FRONTLINE consulting
THE SOCIAL NETWORKS MAXIMUM EFFECT
#earthoptimization #enlightenment2012 #misnicism #SD_ECBS_newsfeed
#SD_ECBS_disclosurelobby #hitlertriangle #hightoweroftrump #DJTthinktank4
http://newsagencyeurope.com
http://hightoweroftrump.org
http://mycoronakill.com
http://my5Gkill.com

Rosenstreet 25
29640 Schneverdingen
GERMANY
phone 0049 5193 966 40 72
fax 0049 5193 966 40 73
mail SD_ECBS@posteo.de
northern germany LUNEBURGER HEATH COUNTRYSIDE
SD_ECBS CEO Allda Ben Marius de Bruycker






presented by the
#SD_ECBS_SWITCHBOARD infoserveroverview
2007-2022
https://earth-colonies-broadcasting-service.net

2015-2022
#SD_ECBS_newsfeed
http://newsagencyeurope.com

2007-2022
NEWSAGENCYEUROPE #SD_ECBS_NEEWSFEED
https://www.bitchute.com/channel/ziJRmzzdvEEN

2020-2022
TELEGRAM
https://t.me/s/newsagencyeurope

2010-2022
FUCKBLOCK
https://www.facebook.com/NEWSAGENCYEUROPE
https://www.facebook.com/NEWSAGENCYEURO … =3&theater
http://infofacebook.org

2019-2022
CRMINAL NWO/ UN AGENDA 2030
CORONA PLANDEMIC DISCLOSURE AND WARNING
https://gab.com/groups/19661
https://wego.social/My5gkill
http://mycoronakill.com
http://supporters-desk.com









WARNING...- Any person and/or institution and/or Agent and/or Agency of any governmental structure including but not limited to the United States Federal Government also using or monitoring/using this website or any of its associated websites, you DO NOT have my permission to utilize any of my profile information nor any of the content contained herein including, but not limited to my photos, and.../or the comments made about my photos or any other "picture" art posted on my profile. You are hereby notified that you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing, disseminating, or taking any other action against me with regard to this profile and the contents herein. The foregoing prohibitions also apply to your employee, agent, student or any personnel under your direction or control the contents of this profile are private and legally privileged and confidential information, and the violation of my personal privacy is punishable by law. UCC 1-103 1-308 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WITHOUT PREJUDICE

For those of you who do not understand the reasoning behind this posting, Facebook is now a publicly traded entity. Unless you state otherwise, anyone
can infringe on your right to privacy once you post to this site. It is recommended that you and other members post a similar notice as this, or you may copy and paste this version. If you do not post such a statement once, then you are indirectly allowing public use of items such as your photos and the information contained in your status. YOU HAVE TO COPY AND PASTE

THIS IS A #FACEBOOK #FACTCHECK FREE ZONE
OUT OF THE FACT OF FACEBOOK AS A HIDDEN MILITARY SPY OPERATION FOR NWO AND NO FASCIST HITLERMAKERS LIKE FACEBOOK FACTCHECK OPERATORS WORKING AS CRIMINALS AGAINST THE LAW AND FREE INFORMATION ACT BUT NEW WORLD ORDER INTERESTS ARE GETTING IN CONTACT WITH MY ACCOUNT UNDER MY NAME  UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE AMERICAN CONGRESS

BASH AND BLOCK ACTIVISM, FILTER MISINFORM AND DELETE. SO NOW WORLD ACTIVISTS MIX 50% TIME TWATTER WITH FUCKBLOCK!!! GUESS WHAT FACEBOOK LOST 50% GETTING PAID FOR ADVERTISEMENT-TIME, RIGHT????

Today, 29 August 2012, making full use of my mental faculties and my ownership of this account in Facebook, I declare, to whom it may concern, and in particular to the administrator of the company Facebook, my author rights are related to all my personal information, comments, texts, articles, illustrations, comics, paintings, photos, professional videos and other publications in electronic format that I spread on this site under my signature. The above on the basis of the principle enshrined in the Berne Convention for the protection of literary and artistic works, as well as with regard to the respective national copyright law. For commercial use of the aforementioned items, always be my written consent. By this statement, I notify Facebook, that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, or take any other action against me based on this profile and/or any of its contents. These prohibited actions also apply to employees, students, agents or members of any team, under the direction or control of Facebook. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of privacy can be punished by law (UCC 1-308 - 1 1 308-103 and the Rome Statute).

Anyone hear this song shall not hold me liable for what I say or display. The content on this song is my opinion, not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, or individual, or anyone or thing. Responsibility: I am fully responsible for the content of this song, not my employer, volunteer group, membership organization, church, or any other agencies which I might be seen to represent. Personal Views: These are my own personal views, which implies that I am responsible for them, not my employee or another agency. This song is solely my opinion. Protection from Commenters: I am not responsible, nor will be held liable, for anything anyone says in the blog comments, nor the laws which they may break in any country through their comments’ content, implication, and intent. No Harm Intended: My "intention" is to do no harm. To not injure others, defame, or liable. This is my opinion and advice, not counsel,and what I write on this song is not to be taken as fact nor absolute. If people use my advice, tips, techniques, and recommendations, and are injured, I am not to be held responsible.

Ben de Bruycker, 56, Ich habe verfasst und verbürge mich von Eides statt, dass alle hier aufgeführten Angaben der Wahrheit entsprechen. Auf die in §§156 und 163 Strafgesetzbuch bin ich hingewiesen worden.
Bürgermeisterkandidat, 2011 Stadt Schneverdingen, Landkreis Heidekreis, Niedersachsen. Ziehsohn von Claus von Borstel, Landesgerichtspräsident Hamburg. 30 Jahre Fernsehtätigkeit danach Internetstudium und Nachrichtenredaktion, NWO-Aufklärung als kriminelle Organisation seit 2007, mit vermutlich weltgrößtem privaten Nonprofit-Infonetzwerk auf höchster Informationsebene (Majestic).

Linkhaftung
Mit Urteil vom 12. Mai 1998 - 312 O 85/98 - "Haftung für Links" entschied das Landgericht Hamburg, dass man durch Anbringung eines Links die Inhalte der gelinkten Seite ggf. mit zu verantworten hat. Dies kann - so das Landesgericht - nur dadurch verhindert werden dass man sich ausdrücklich von diesen Inhalten distanziert, was ich mit nachfolgender Erklärung ausdrücklich tue: Für alle Links gilt, dass ich keinen Einfluss auf die Gestaltung und Inhalte der verlinkten Seiten habe. Ich distanziere mich ausdrücklich von allen Inhalten dieser Seiten. Ferner weise ich darauf hin, dass ich keine Verantwortung für die Inhalte der Seiten trage. Diese Erklärung gilt für alle auf den Internetseiten der mir angebrachten Links, Videos, Fots, und auch für alle Inhalte der Seiten, zu denen die Werbebanner führen.

und ausserdem

Abweichend von den Facebook AGB`s sind die von mir hier veröffentlichten Fotos, Kommentare (bzw. mein Gedankengut) und persönlichen Informationen nicht zur unentgeltlichen weiteren Verwendung durch Facebook freigegeben. Ich widerspreche der Nutzung oder Übermittlung meiner Daten, sofern ich dies nicht ausdrücklich in Schriftform zugelassen habe, sowie deren Nutzung und Weitergabe für Werbezwecke oder für die Markt- oder Meinungsforschung.

Disclaimer
1. Inhalt des Onlineangebotes
Der Autor übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen den Autor, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens des Autors kein nachweislich vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.
Alle Angebote sind freibleibend und unverbindlich. Der Autor behält es sich ausdrücklich vor, Teile der Seiten oder das gesamte Angebot ohne gesonderte Ankündigung zu verändern, zu ergänzen, zu löschen oder die Veröffentlichung zeitweise oder endgültig einzustellen.
2. Verweise und Links
Bei direkten oder indirekten Verweisen auf fremde Webseiten ("Hyperlinks"), die außerhalb des Verantwortungs-bereiches des Autors liegen, würde eine Haftungsverpflichtung ausschließlich in dem Fall in Kraft treten, in dem der Autor von den Inhalten Kenntnis hat und es ihm technisch möglich und zumutbar wäre, die Nutzung im Falle rechtswidriger Inhalte zu verhindern.
Der Autor erklärt hiermit ausdrücklich, dass zum Zeitpunkt der Linksetzung keine illegalen Inhalte auf den zu verlinkenden Seiten erkennbar waren. Auf die aktuelle und zukünftige Gestaltung, die Inhalte oder die Urheberschaft der gelinkten/verknüpften Seiten hat der Autor keinerlei Einfluss. Deshalb distanziert er sich hiermit ausdrücklich von allen Inhalten aller gelinkten /verknüpften Seiten, die nach der Linksetzung verändert wurden. Diese Feststellung gilt für alle innerhalb des eigenen Internetangebotes gesetzten Links und Verweise sowie für Fremdeinträge in vom Autor eingerichteten Gästebüchern, Diskussionsforen und Mailinglisten. Für illegale, fehlerhafte oder unvollständige Inhalte und insbesondere für Schäden, die aus der Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung solcherart dargebotener Informationen entstehen, haftet allein der Anbieter der Seite, auf welche verwiesen wurde, nicht derjenige, der über Links auf die jeweilige Veröffentlichung lediglich verweist.
3. Urheber- und Kennzeichenrecht
Der Autor ist bestrebt, in allen Publikationen die Urheberrechte der verwendeten Grafiken, Tondokumente, Videosequenzen und Texte zu beachten, von ihm selbst erstellte Grafiken, Tondokumente, Videosequenzen und Texte zu nutzen oder auf lizenzfreie Grafiken, Tondokumente, Videosequenzen und Texte zurückzugreifen.
Alle innerhalb des Internetangebotes genannten und ggf. durch Dritte geschützten Marken- und Warenzeichen unterliegen uneingeschränkt den Bestimmungen des jeweils gültigen Kennzeichenrechts und den Besitzrechten der jeweiligen eingetragenen Eigentümer. Allein aufgrund der bloßen Nennung ist nicht der Schluss zu ziehen, dass Markenzeichen nicht durch Rechte Dritter geschützt sind!
Das Copyright für veröffentlichte, vom Autor selbst erstellte Objekte bleibt allein beim Autor der Seiten. Eine Vervielfältigung oder Verwendung solcher Grafiken, Tondokumente, Videosequenzen und Texte in anderen elektronischen oder gedruckten Publikationen ist ohne ausdrückliche Zustimmung des Autors nicht gestattet.
4. Datenschutz
Sofern innerhalb des Internetangebotes die Möglichkeit zur Eingabe persönlicher oder geschäftlicher Daten (Emailadressen, Namen, Anschriften) besteht, so erfolgt die Preisgabe dieser Daten seitens des Nutzers auf ausdrücklich freiwilliger Basis. Die Inanspruchnahme und Bezahlung aller angebotenen Dienste ist - soweit technisch möglich und zumutbar - auch ohne Angabe solcher Daten bzw. unter Angabe anonymisierter Daten oder eines Pseudonyms gestattet. Die Nutzung der im Rahmen des Impressums oder vergleichbarer Angaben veröffentlichten Kontaktdaten wie Postanschriften, Telefon- und Faxnummern sowie Emailadressen durch Dritte zur Übersendung von nicht ausdrücklich angeforderten Informationen ist nicht gestattet. Rechtliche Schritte gegen die Versender von sogenannten Spam-Mails bei Verstössen gegen dieses Verbot sind ausdrücklich vorbehalten.
5. Rechtswirk-samkeit dieses Haftungs-ausschlusses
Dieser Haftungsausschluss ist als Teil des Internetangebotes zu betrachten, von dem aus auf diese Seite verwiesen wurde. Sofern Teile oder einzelne Formulierungen dieses Textes der geltenden Rechtslage nicht, nicht mehr oder nicht vollständig entsprechen sollten, bleiben die übrigen Teile des Dokumentes in ihrem Inhalt und ihrer Gültigkeit davon unberührt.


Edited by: SD_ECBS BEN - Jun-29-20 14:07:07
SD_ECBS BEN FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO useravatar Online 11289 Posts
   Thank you
Male   Website   COM_AGORAPRO_PMS

DONATION FOR THE WORLDS GREATEST PRIVATE INFORMATION NETWORK PROGRAMMED
2007-2021 YOU CAN SEND VIA PAYPAL.COM ON

gern_geschehn@gmx.de

Edited by: SD_ECBS BEN - Jul-29-22 04:59:46

SD_ECBS BEN
FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO
useravatar
Offline
13871 Posts
Male  Website 
Administrator has disabled public posting. Please login or register in order to proceed.

Re: HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES




Bumblebee
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Bombus" redirects here. For other uses, see Bombus (disambiguation).
Bumblebee

PreꞒꞒOSDCPTJKPgN
Bombus lapidarius - Melilotus officinalis - Tallinn.jpg
Red-tailed bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom:    Animalia
Phylum:    Arthropoda
Class:    Insecta
Order:    Hymenoptera
Family:    Apidae
Tribe:    Bombini
Genus:    Bombus
Latreille, 1802
Diversity
> 250 species and subspecies
Bombus distribution.jpg
Natural distribution shown in red.
Introductions to New Zealand, spread to Tasmania not shown
A bumblebee (or bumble bee, bumble-bee, or humble-bee) is any of over 250 species in the genus Bombus, part of Apidae, one of the bee families. This genus is the only extant group in the tribe Bombini, though a few extinct related genera (e.g., Calyptapis) are known from fossils. They are found primarily in higher altitudes or latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, although they are also found in South America, where a few lowland tropical species have been identified. European bumblebees have also been introduced to New Zealand and Tasmania. Female bumblebees can sting repeatedly, but generally ignore humans and other animals.

Most bumblebees are social insects that form colonies with a single queen. The colonies are smaller than those of honey bees, growing to as few as 50 individuals in a nest. Cuckoo bumblebees are brood parasitic and do not make nests or form colonies; their queens aggressively invade the nests of other bumblebee species, kill the resident queens and then lay their own eggs, which are cared for by the resident workers. Cuckoo bumblebees were previously classified as a separate genus, but are now usually treated as members of Bombus.

Bumblebees have round bodies covered in soft hair (long branched setae) called 'pile', making them appear and feel fuzzy. They have aposematic (warning) coloration, often consisting of contrasting bands of colour, and different species of bumblebee in a region often resemble each other in mutually protective Müllerian mimicry. Harmless insects such as hoverflies often derive protection from resembling bumblebees, in Batesian mimicry, and may be confused with them. Nest-making bumblebees can be distinguished from similarly large, fuzzy cuckoo bees by the form of the female hind leg. In nesting bumblebees, it is modified to form a pollen basket, a bare shiny area surrounded by a fringe of hairs used to transport pollen, whereas in cuckoo bees, the hind leg is hairy all round, and they never carry pollen.

Like their relatives the honeybees, bumblebees feed on nectar, using their long hairy tongues to lap up the liquid; the proboscis is folded under the head during flight. Bumblebees gather nectar to add to the stores in the nest, and pollen to feed their young. They forage using colour and spatial relationships to identify flowers to feed from. Some bumblebees steal nectar, making a hole near the base of a flower to access the nectar while avoiding pollen transfer. Bumblebees are important agricultural pollinators, so their decline in Europe, North America, and Asia is a cause for concern. The decline has been caused by habitat loss, the mechanisation of agriculture, and pesticides.


Contents
1    Etymology and common names
2    Phylogeny
3    Taxonomy
4    General description
5    Distribution and habitat
6    Biology
6.1    Feeding
6.2    Wax production
6.3    Coloration
6.4    Temperature control
6.4.1    Chill-coma temperature
6.5    Communication and social learning
6.6    Reproduction and nesting
6.7    Foraging behaviour
6.8    Asynchronous flight muscles
6.9    Cuckoo bumblebees
6.10    Sting
7    Predators, parasites, and pathogens
8    Relationship to humans
8.1    Agricultural use
8.2    Population decline
8.3    Conservation efforts
8.4    Misconception about flight
8.5    In music and literature
8.6    Military
9    See also
10    Notes
11    References
12    Sources
13    External links
Etymology and common names

Beatrix Potter's 1910 story The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse features a "bumble bee" called Babbity Bumble
The word "bumblebee" is a compound of "bumble" and "bee"—'bumble' meaning to hum, buzz, drone, or move ineptly or flounderingly.[1] The generic name Bombus, assigned by Pierre André Latreille in 1802, is derived from the Latin word for a buzzing or humming sound, borrowed from Ancient Greek βόμβος (bómbos).[2]

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the term "bumblebee" was first recorded as having been used in the English language in the 1530 work Lesclarcissement by John Palsgrave, "I bomme, as a bombyll bee dothe."[3] However the OED also states that the term "humblebee" predates it, having first been used in 1450 in Fysshynge wyth Angle, "In Juyll the greshop & the humbylbee in the medow."[4] The latter term was used in A Midsummer Night's Dream (c. 1600) by William Shakespeare, "The honie-bags steale from the humble Bees."[5] Similar terms are used in other Germanic languages, such as the German Hummel (Old High German humbala),[6] Dutch hommel or Swedish humla.

An old provincial name, "dumbledor", also denoted a buzzing insect such as a bumblebee or cockchafer, "dumble" probably imitating the sound of these insects, while "dor" meant "beetle".[7]

In On the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin speculated about "humble-bees" and their interactions with other species:[8]

I have [...] reason to believe that humble-bees are indispensable to the fertilisation of the heartsease (Viola tricolor), for other bees do not visit this flower. From experiments which I have tried, I have found that the visits of bees, if not indispensable, are at least highly beneficial to the fertilisation of our clovers; but humble-bees alone visit the common red clover (Trifolium pratense), as other bees cannot reach the nectar.
However, "bumblebee" remained in use, for example in The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse (1910) by Beatrix Potter, "Suddenly round a corner, she met Babbitty Bumble--"Zizz, Bizz, Bizzz!" said the bumble bee." Since World War II "humblebee" has fallen into near-total disuse.[9]

Phylogeny
The bumblebee tribe Bombini is one of four groups of corbiculate bees (those with pollen baskets) in the Apidae, the others being the Apini (honey bees), Euglossini (orchid bees), and Meliponini (stingless bees). The corbiculate bees are a monophyletic group. Advanced eusocial behaviour appears to have evolved twice in the group, giving rise to controversy, now largely settled, as to the phylogenetic origins of the four tribes; it had been supposed that eusocial behaviour had evolved only once, requiring the Apini to be close to the Meliponini, which they do not resemble. It is now thought that the Apini (with advanced societies) and Euglossini are closely related, while the primitively eusocial Bombini are close to the Meliponini, which have somewhat more advanced eusocial behaviour. Sophie Cardinal and Bryan Danforth comment that "While remarkable, a hypothesis of dual origins of advanced eusociality is congruent with early studies on corbiculate morphology and social behavior."[10] Their analysis, combining molecular, morphological and behavioural data, gives the following cladogram:[10]

Corbiculate bees   
    
Apini (honeybees)

Euglossini (orchid bees)

Bombini (bumblebees)

Meliponini (stingless bees)

Bombus pristinus described in 1867

Calyptapis florissantensis, Eocene Florissant Formation
On this hypothesis, the molecular data suggest that the Bombini are 25 to 40 million years old, while the Meliponini (and thus the clade that includes the Bombini and Meliponini) are 81 to 96 million years old, about the same age as the corbiculate group.[10]

However, a more recent phylogeny using transcriptome data from 3,647 genes of ten corbiculate bee species supports the single origin of eusociality hypothesis in the corbiculate bees.[11] They find that Bombini is in fact sister to Meliponini, corroborating that previous finding from Sophie Cardinal and Bryan Danforth (2011). However, Romiguier et al. (2015) shows that Bombini, Meliponini, and Apini form a monophyletic group, where Apini shares a most recent common ancestor with the Bombini and Meliponini clade, while Euglossini is most distantly related to all three, since it does not share the same most recent common ancestor as Bombini, Meliponini, and Apini. Thus, their analysis supports the single origin of eusociality hypothesis within the corbiculate bees, where eusociality evolved in the common ancestor of Bombini, Apini, and Meliponini.

The fossil record for bees is limited, with around 14 species that might possibly be Bombini having been described by 2019. The only Bombus relatives in Bombini are the late Eocene Calyptapis florissantensis from the Florissant Formation, USA, and Oligobombus cuspidatus from the Bembridge Marls of the Isle of Wight.[12][13] Two species of Bombus have been described from the Oligocene of Beşkonak, Bucak Turkey: Bombus (Mendacibombus) beskonakensis[14] and Bombus (Paraelectrobombus) patriciae. Both species were originally placed in genera considered at the time of description as outside of Bombus, being initially named Oligoapis beskonakensis and Paraelectrobombus patriciae respectively, however reexaminiation of the fore-wings lead to both being considered as Bombus species[15] In 2012 a fossil bumblebee from the Miocene was found in Germany's Randeck Maar and classified as Bombus (Bombus) randeckensis.[14] In 2014, another species, Bombus cerdanyensis, was described from Late Miocene lacustrine beds of La Cerdanya, Spain, but not initially placed into any subgenus,[16] The species Bombus trophonius was described in October 2017 and placed in Bombus subgenus Cullumanobombus.[17] A redescription of the Bombini fossil record by Dehon et al (2019) resulted in the synonymization of the genus Oligoapis with Bombus subgenus Mendacibombus, and the placement of genus Paraelectrobombus as Bombus subgenus Paraelectrobombus, rather than as a genus in Electrobombini. The subgenus Cullumanobombus was expanded to include not only Bombus trophonius but also Bombus randeckensis which was moved from subgenus Bombus and Bombus pristinus, first described by Unger (1867). Within the subgenus Melanobombus only Bombus cerdanyensis is present from the fossil record. An additional three species, "Bombus" luianus, "Bombus" anacolus and "Bombus" dilectus have been attributed to Bombus from the Middle Miocene Shanwang formation of China by Zhang, (1990) and Zhang et al (1994). Due to not being able to study Zhang's type specimens, but only illustrations of the fossils, Dehon et al did not place the three species within any specific subgenera, and considered all three as "species inquirenda", needing fuller re-examination. Two other species were not examined at all by Dehon et al, Bombus? crassipes of the Late Miocene Krottensee deposits in the Czech Republic, and Bombus proavus from the Middle Miocene Latah Formation, USA.[15]

Taxonomy
Further information: List of bumblebee species
The genus Bombus, the only one extant genus in the tribe Bombini, comprises over 250 species;[18] for an overview of the differences between bumblebees and other bees and wasps, see characteristics of common wasps and bees. The genus has been divided variously into up to 49 subgenera, a degree of complexity criticised by Williams (2008).[19] The cuckoo bumblebees Psithyrus have sometimes been treated as a separate genus but are now considered to be part of Bombus, in one or more subgenera.[19]

Examples of Bombus species include Bombus pauloensis, Bombus dahlbomii, Bombus fervidus, Bombus lapidarius, Bombus ruderatus, and Bombus rupestris.

Bombus (genus)   
    
Mendacibombus, 12 species

Bombias, 3 species

Kallobombus, 1 species

Orientalibombus, 3 species

Subterraneobombus, 10 species

Megabombus, 22 species

Thoracobombus, 50 species

Psithyrus, 30 species

Pyrobombus, 50 species

Alpinobombus, 5 species

Bombus (subgenus), 5 species
    
Alpigenobombus, 7 species

Melanobombus, 17 species

Sibiricobombus, 7 species

Cullumanobombus, 23 species




Subgenera of the genus Bombus
General description
Further information: Characteristics of common wasps and bees
Bumblebees vary in appearance, but are generally plump and densely furry. They are larger, broader and stouter-bodied than honeybees, and their abdomen tip is more rounded. Many species have broad bands of colour, the patterns helping to distinguish different species. Whereas honeybees have short tongues and therefore mainly pollinate open flowers, some bumblebee species have long tongues and collect nectar from flowers that are closed into a tube.[20] Bumblebees have fewer stripes (or none), and usually have part of the body covered in black fur, while honeybees have many stripes including several grey stripes on the abdomen.[21] Sizes are very variable even within species; the largest British species, B. terrestris, has queens up to 22 mm (0.9 in) long, males up to 16 mm (0.6 in) long, and workers between 11 and 17 mm (0.4–0.7 in) long.[22] The largest bumblebee species in the world is B. dahlbomii of Chile, up to about 40 mm (1.6 in) long, and described as "flying mice" and "a monstrous fluffy ginger beast".[23]

Distribution and habitat
Bumblebees are typically found in temperate climates, and are often found at higher latitudes and altitudes than other bees, although a few lowland tropical species exist.[24] A few species (B. polaris and B. alpinus) range into very cold climates where other bees might not be found; B. polaris occurs in northern Ellesmere Island in the high Arctic, along with another bumblebee B. hyperboreus, which parasitises its nest. This is the northernmost occurrence of any eusocial insect.[25] One reason for their presence in cold places is that bumblebees can regulate their body temperature, via solar radiation, internal mechanisms of "shivering" and radiative cooling from the abdomen (called heterothermy). Other bees have similar physiology, but the mechanisms seem best developed and have been most studied in bumblebees.[26] They adapt to higher elevations by extending their wing stroke amplitude.[27] Bumblebees have a largely cosmopolitan distribution but are absent from Australia (apart from Tasmania where they have been introduced) and are found in Africa only north of the Sahara.[28] More than a hundred years ago they were also introduced to New Zealand, where they play an important role as efficient pollinators.[citation needed]

Biology

A common carder bumblebee Bombus pascuorum extending its tongue towards a Heuchera inflorescence
Feeding
The bumblebee tongue (the proboscis) is a long, hairy structure that extends from a sheath-like modified maxilla. The primary action of the tongue is lapping, that is, repeated dipping of the tongue into liquid.[29] The tip of the tongue probably acts as a suction cup and during lapping, nectar may be drawn up the proboscis by capillary action. When at rest or flying, the proboscis is kept folded under the head. The longer the tongue, the deeper the bumblebee can probe into a flower and bees probably learn from experience which flower source is best-suited to their tongue length.[30] Bees with shorter proboscides, like Bombus bifarius, have a more difficult time foraging nectar relative to other bumblebees with longer proboscides; to overcome this disadvantage, B. bifarius workers were observed to lick the back of spurs on the nectar duct, which resulted in a small reward.[31]

Wax production
The exoskeleton of the abdomen is divided into plates called dorsal tergites and ventral sternites. Wax is secreted from glands on the abdomen and extruded between the sternites where it resembles flakes of dandruff. It is secreted by the queen when she starts a nest and by young workers. It is scraped from the abdomen by the legs, moulded until malleable and used in the construction of honeypots, to cover the eggs, to line empty cocoons for use as storage containers and sometimes to cover the exterior of the nest.[32]

Coloration

Cuckoo bumblebees, like this Bombus barbutellus, have similar aposematic (warning) coloration to nest-making bumblebees, and may also mimic their host species.
Further information: aposematism and mimicry
The brightly coloured pile of the bumblebee is an aposematic (warning) signal, given that females can inflict a painful sting. Depending on the species and morph, the warning colours range from entirely black, to bright yellow, red, orange, white, and pink.[33] Dipteran flies in the families Syrphidae (hoverflies), Asilidae (robber flies), Tabanidae (horseflies), Oestridae (bot or warble flies) and Bombyliidae (bee flies, such as Bombylius major) all include Batesian mimics of bumblebees, resembling them closely enough to deceive at least some predators.[34]

Many species of Bombus, including the group sometimes called Psithyrus (cuckoo bumblebees), have evolved Müllerian mimicry, where the different bumblebees in a region resemble each other, so that a young predator need only learn to avoid any of them once. For example, in California a group of bumblebees consists of largely black species including B. californicus, B. caliginosus, B. vandykei, B. vosnesenskii, B. insularis and B. fernaldae. Other bees in California include a group of species all banded black and yellow. In each case, Müllerian mimicry provides the bees in the group with a selective advantage.[34] In addition, parasitic (cuckoo) bumblebees resemble their hosts more closely than would be expected by chance, at least in areas like Europe where parasite-host co-speciation is common; but this too may be explained as Müllerian mimicry, rather than requiring the parasite's coloration to deceive the host (aggressive mimicry).[35]

Temperature control
Bumblebees are active under conditions during which honeybees stay at home, and can readily absorb heat from even weak sunshine.[36] The thick pile created by long setae (bristles) acts as insulation to keep bumblebees warm in cold weather; species from cold climates have longer setae (and thus thicker insulation) than those from the tropics.[37] The temperature of the flight muscles, which occupy much of the thorax, needs to be at least 30 °C (86 °F) before flight can take place. The muscle temperature can be raised by shivering. It takes about five minutes for the muscles to reach this temperature at an air temperature of 13 °C (55 °F).[38]

Chill-coma temperature
The chill-coma temperature in relation to flying insects is the temperature at which flight muscles cannot be activated. Compared to honey bees and carpenter bees, bumblebees have the lowest chill-coma temperature. Of the bumblebees Bombus bimaculatus has the lowest at 7 °C (45 °F). However, bumblebees have been seen to fly in colder ambient temperatures. This discrepancy is likely because the chill-coma temperature was determined by tests done in a laboratory setting. However, bumblebees live in insulated shelters and can shiver to warm up before venturing into the cold.[39]

Communication and social learning
Bumblebees do not have ears, and it is not known whether or how well they can hear. However, they are sensitive to the vibrations made by sound travelling through wood or other materials.[32]

Bumblebees do not exhibit the "bee dances" used by honeybees to tell other workers the locations of food sources. Instead, when they return from a successful foraging expedition, they run excitedly around in the nest for several minutes before going out to forage once more. These bees may be offering some form of communication based on the buzzing sounds made by their wings, which may stimulate other bees to start foraging.[40] Another stimulant to foraging activity is the level of food reserves in the colony. Bees monitor the amount of honey in the honeypots, and when little is left or when high-quality food is added, they are more likely to go out to forage.[41]

Bumblebees have been observed to partake in social learning. In a 2017 study involving Bombus terrestris, bees were taught to complete an unnatural task of moving large objects to obtain a reward. Bees who first observed another bee complete the task were significantly more successful in learning the task than bees who observed the same action performed by a magnet, indicating the importance of social information. The bees did not copy one another exactly: in fact, the study suggested that the bees were instead attempting to emulate one another's goals.[42][43]

Reproduction and nesting

Nest of red-tailed bumblebee. Bombus lapidarius, showing wax pots full of honey
Further information: haplodiploidy and worker policing
Nest size depends on species of bumblebee. Most form colonies of between 50 and 400 individuals,[44] but colonies have been documented as small as ~20 individuals and as large as 1700.[45] These nests are small compared to honeybee hives, which hold about 50,000 bees. Many species nest underground, choosing old rodent burrows or sheltered places, and avoiding places that receive direct sunlight that could result in overheating. Other species make nests above ground, whether in thick grass or in holes in trees. A bumblebee nest is not organised into hexagonal combs like that of a honeybee; the cells are instead clustered together untidily. The workers remove dead bees or larvae from the nest and deposit them outside the nest entrance, helping to prevent disease. Nests in temperate regions last only for a single season and do not survive the winter.[44]

In the early spring, the queen comes out of diapause and finds a suitable place to create her colony. Then she builds wax cells in which to lay her eggs which were fertilised the previous year. The eggs that hatch develop into female workers, and in time, the queen populates the colony, with workers feeding the young and performing other duties similar to honeybee workers. In temperate zones, young queens (gynes) leave the nest in the autumn and mate, often more than once, with males (drones) that are forcibly driven out of the colony.[46] The drones and workers die as the weather turns colder; the young queens feed intensively to build up stores of fat for the winter. They survive in a resting state (diapause), generally below ground, until the weather warms up in the spring with the early bumblebee being the species that is among the first to emerge.[46][47][48] Many species of bumblebee follow this general trend within the year. Bombus pensylvanicus is a species that follows this type of colony cycle.[49] For this species the cycle begins in February, reproduction starts in July or August, and ends in the winter months. The queen remains in hibernation until spring of the following year in order to optimize conditions to search for a nest.[50]


Bumblebee life-cycle showing adults and larvae in nest of B. terrestris. Engraved in 1840 by William Home Lizars after drawing probably by James Hope Stewart.[51]
In fertilised queens, the ovaries only become active when the queen starts to lay. An egg passes along the oviduct to the vagina where there is a chamber called the spermatheca, in which the sperm from the mating is stored. Depending on need, she may allow her egg to be fertilised. Unfertilised eggs become haploid males; fertilised eggs grow into diploid females and queens.[52] The hormones that stimulate the development of the ovaries are suppressed in female worker bees, while the queen remains dominant.[46]

To develop, the larvae must be fed both nectar for carbohydrates and pollen for protein. Bumblebees feed nectar to the larvae by chewing a small hole in the brood cell into which they regurgitate nectar. Larvae are fed pollen in one of two ways, depending on the bumblebee species. Pocket-making bumblebees create pockets of pollen at the base of the brood-cell clump from which the larvae feed themselves. Pollen-storing bumblebees keep pollen in separate wax pots and feed it to the larvae.[53]


An above-ground nest, hidden in grass and moss, of the common carder bee, Bombus pascuorum. The wax canopy or involucrum has been removed to show winged workers and pupae in irregularly placed wax cells.
After the emergence of the first or second group of offspring, workers take over the task of foraging and the queen spends most of her time laying eggs and caring for larvae. The colony grows progressively larger and eventually begins to produce males and new queens.[46] Bumblebee workers can lay unfertilised haploid eggs (with only a single set of chromosomes) that develop into viable male bumblebees. Only fertilised queens can lay diploid eggs (one set of chromosomes from a drone, one from the queen) that mature into workers and new queens.[54]

In a young colony, the queen minimises reproductive competition from workers by suppressing their egg-laying through physical aggression and pheromones.[55] Worker policing leads to nearly all eggs laid by workers being eaten.[56] Thus, the queen is usually the mother of all of the first males laid. Workers eventually begin to lay male eggs later in the season when the queen's ability to suppress their reproduction diminishes.[57] Because of the reproductive competition between workers and the queen, bumblebees are considered "primitively eusocial".[10][56]

Although a large majority of bumblebees follow such monogynous colony cycles that only involve one queen, some select Bombus species (such as Bombus pauloensis) will spend part of their life cycle in a polygynous phase (have multiple queens in one nest during these periods of polygyny).[58]

Foraging behaviour
Further information: Bumblebee communication and nectar robbing

A bumblebee loaded with pollen in its pollen baskets
Bumblebees generally visit flowers that exhibit the bee pollination syndrome and these patches of flowers may be up to 1–2 km from their colony.[59] They tend to visit the same patches of flowers every day, as long as they continue to find nectar and pollen there,[60] a habit known as pollinator or flower constancy. While foraging, bumblebees can reach ground speeds of up to 15 m/s (54 km/h).[61]

Bumblebees use a combination of colour and spatial relationships to learn which flowers to forage from.[62] They can also detect both the presence and the pattern of electric fields on flowers, which occur due to atmospheric electricity, and take a while to leak away into the ground. They use this information to find out if a flower has been recently visited by another bee.[63] Bumblebees can detect the temperature of flowers,[64] as well as which parts of the flower are hotter or cooler[65] and use this information to recognise flowers. After arriving at a flower, they extract nectar using their long tongues ("glossae") and store it in their crops. Many species of bumblebees also exhibit "nectar robbing": instead of inserting the mouthparts into the flower in the normal way, these bees bite directly through the base of the corolla to extract nectar, avoiding pollen transfer.[66]


Biting open the stem of a flower...

...and using its tongue to drink the nectar.
A bumblebee "nectar robbing" a flower
Pollen is removed from flowers deliberately or incidentally by bumblebees. Incidental removal occurs when bumblebees come in contact with the anthers of a flower while collecting nectar. When it enters a flower, the bumblebee's body hairs receive a dusting of pollen from the anthers. In queens and workers this is then groomed into the corbiculae (pollen baskets) on the hind legs where it can be seen as bulging masses that may contain as many as a million pollen grains. Male bumblebees do not have corbiculae and do not purposively collect pollen.[67] Bumblebees are also capable of buzz pollination, in which they dislodge pollen from the anthers by creating a resonant vibration with their flight muscles.[68]

In at least some species, once a bumblebee has visited a flower, it leaves a scent mark on it. This scent mark deters bumblebees from visiting that flower until the scent degrades.[69] This scent mark is a general chemical bouquet that bumblebees leave behind in different locations (e.g. nest, neutral, and food sites),[70] and they learn to use this bouquet to identify both rewarding and unrewarding flowers,[71] and may be able to identify who else has visited a flower.[72] Bumblebees rely on this chemical bouquet more when the flower has a high handling time, that is, where it takes a longer time for the bee to find the nectar once inside the flower.[73]

Once they have collected nectar and pollen, female workers return to the nest and deposit the harvest into brood cells, or into wax cells for storage. Unlike honeybees, bumblebees only store a few days' worth of food, so are much more vulnerable to food shortages.[74] Male bumblebees collect only nectar and do so to feed themselves. They may visit quite different flowers from the workers because of their different nutritional needs.[75]

Asynchronous flight muscles
Bees beat their wings about 200 times a second. Their thorax muscles do not contract on each nerve firing, but rather vibrate like a plucked rubber band. This is efficient, since it lets the system consisting of muscle and wing operate at its resonant frequency, leading to low energy consumption. Further, it is necessary, since insect motor nerves generally cannot fire 200 times per second.[76] These types of muscles are called asynchronous muscles[77] and are found in the insect wing systems in families such as Hymenoptera, Diptera, Coleoptera, and Hemiptera.[76] Bumblebees must warm up their bodies considerably to get airborne at low ambient temperatures. Bumblebees can reach an internal thoracic temperature of 30 °C (86 °F) using this method.[26][78]

Cuckoo bumblebees

The cuckoo bumblebee B. vestalis, a parasite of B. terrestris
Main article: Psithyrus
Bumblebees of the subgenus Psithyrus (known as 'cuckoo bumblebees', and formerly considered a separate genus) are brood parasites,[79] sometimes called kleptoparasites,[80] in the colonies of other bumblebees, and have lost the ability to collect pollen. Before finding and invading a host colony, a Psithyrus female, such as that of the Psithyrus species of B. sylvestris,[81] feeds directly from flowers. Once she has infiltrated a host colony, the Psithyrus female kills or subdues the queen of that colony, and uses pheromones and physical attacks to force the workers of that colony to feed her and her young.[82] Usually, cuckoo bumblebees can be described as queen-intolerant inquilines, since the host queen is often killed to enable the parasite to produce more offspring,[79] though some species, such as B. bohemicus, actually enjoy increased success when they leave the host queen alive.[83]

The female Psithyrus has a number of morphological adaptations for combat, such as larger mandibles, a tough cuticle and a larger venom sac that increase her chances of taking over a nest.[84] Upon emerging from their cocoons, the Psithyrus males and females disperse and mate. The males do not survive the winter but, like nonparasitic bumblebee queens, Psithyrus females find suitable locations to spend the winter and enter diapause after mating. They usually emerge from hibernation later than their host species. Each species of cuckoo bee has a specific host species, which it may physically resemble.[85] In the case of the parasitism of B. terrestris by B. (Psithyrus) vestalis, genetic analysis of individuals captured in the wild showed that about 42% of the host species' nests at a single location[a] had "[lost] their fight against their parasite".[79]

Sting
Queen and worker bumblebees can sting. Unlike in honeybees, a bumblebee's stinger lacks barbs, so the bee can sting repeatedly without leaving the stinger in the wound and thereby injuring itself.[86][87] Bumblebee species are not normally aggressive, but may sting in defence of their nest, or if harmed. Female cuckoo bumblebees aggressively attack host colony members, and sting the host queen, but ignore other animals unless disturbed.[88]

The sting is painful to humans, and not medically significant in most cases, although it may trigger an allergic reaction in susceptible individuals.[citation needed]

Predators, parasites, and pathogens

Bumblebee nest dug up and destroyed by a predator, probably a badger
Bumblebees, despite their ability to sting, are eaten by certain predators. Nests may be dug up by badgers and eaten whole, including any adults present.[89] Adults are preyed upon by robber flies and beewolves in North America.[90] In Europe, birds including bee-eaters and shrikes capture adult bumblebees on the wing; smaller birds such as great tits also occasionally learn to take bumblebees, while camouflaged crab spiders catch them as they visit flowers.[91]


Bumblebee stored as food by a great grey shrike
The great grey shrike is able to detect flying bumblebees up to 100 m (330 ft) away; once captured, the sting is removed by repeatedly squeezing the insect with the mandibles and wiping the abdomen on a branch.[92] The European honey buzzard follows flying bees back to their nest, digs out the nest with its feet, and eats larvae, pupae and adults as it finds them.[93]

Bumblebees are parasitised by tracheal mites, Locustacarus buchneri; protozoans including Crithidia bombi and Apicystis bombi; and microsporidians including Nosema bombi and Nosema ceranae. The tree bumblebee B. hypnorum has spread into the United Kingdom despite hosting high levels of a nematode that normally interferes with queen bees' attempts to establish colonies.[94] Deformed wing virus has been found to affect 11% of bumblebees in Great Britain.[95]

Female bee moths (Aphomia sociella) prefer to lay their eggs in bumblebee nests. The A. sociella larvae will then feed on the eggs, larvae, and pupae left unprotected by the bumblebees, sometimes destroying large parts of the nest.[96]

Relationship to humans

Bumblebees and human culture: Bombus anachoreta on a Russian postage stamp, 2005
Agricultural use
Further information: List of crop plants pollinated by bees
Bumblebees are important pollinators of both crops and wildflowers.[97] Because bumblebees do not overwinter the entire colony, they do not stockpile honey, and therefore are not useful as honey producers. Bumblebees are increasingly cultured for agricultural use as pollinators, among other reasons because they can pollinate plants such as tomato in greenhouses by buzz pollination whereas other pollinators cannot.[98] Commercial production began in 1987, when Roland De Jonghe founded the Biobest company; in 1988 they produced enough nests to pollinate 40 hectares of tomatoes. The industry grew quickly, starting with other companies in the Netherlands. Bumblebee nests, mainly of buff-tailed bumblebees, are produced in at least 30 factories around the world; over a million nests are grown annually in Europe; Turkey is a major producer.[99]

Bumblebees are Northern Hemisphere animals. When red clover was introduced as a crop to New Zealand in the nineteenth century, it was found to have no local pollinators, and clover seed had accordingly to be imported each year. Four species of bumblebee from the United Kingdom were therefore imported as pollinators. In 1885 and 1886 the Canterbury Acclimatization Society brought in 442 queens, of which 93 survived and quickly multiplied. As planned, red clover was soon being produced from locally-grown seed.[36] Bumblebees are also reared commercially to pollinate tomatoes grown in greenhouses.[52] The New Zealand population of buff-tailed bumblebees began colonising Tasmania, 1,500 miles (2,400 km) away, after being introduced there in 1992 under unclear circumstances.[100]

Some concerns exist about the impact of the international trade in mass-produced bumblebee colonies. Evidence from Japan[101] and South America[102] indicates bumblebees can escape and naturalise in new environments, causing damage to native pollinators. Greater use of native pollinators, such as Bombus ignitus in China and Japan, has occurred as a result.[103] In addition, mounting evidence indicates mass-produced bumblebees may also carry diseases, harmful to wild bumblebees[104][105] and honeybees.[105]

In Canada and Sweden it has been shown that growing a mosaic of different crops encourages bumblebees and provides higher yields than does a monoculture of oilseed rape, despite the fact that the bees were attracted to the crop.[106]

Population decline
Bumblebee species are declining in Europe, North America, and Asia due to a number of factors, including land-use change that reduces their food plants. In North America, pathogens are possibly having a stronger negative effect especially for the subgenus Bombus.[107] A major impact on bumblebees was caused by the mechanisation of agriculture, accelerated by the urgent need to increase food production during the Second World War. Small farms depended on horses to pull implements and carts. The horses were fed on clover and hay, both of which were permanently grown on a typical farm. Little artificial fertiliser was used. Farms thus provided flowering clover and flower-rich meadows, favouring bumblebees. Mechanisation removed the need for horses and most of the clover; artificial fertilisers encouraged the growth of taller grasses, outcompeting the meadow flowers. Most of the flowers, and the bumblebees that fed on them, disappeared from Britain by the early 1980s. The last native British short-haired bumblebee was captured near Dungeness in 1988.[108] This significant increase in pesticide and fertilizer use associated with the industrialization of agriculture has had adverse effects on the genus Bombus. The bees are directly exposed to the chemicals in two ways: by consuming nectar that has been directly treated with pesticide, or through physical contact with treated plants and flowers. The species Bombus hortorum in particular has been found to be impacted by the pesticides; their brood development has been reduced and their memory has been negatively affected. Additionally, pesticide use negatively impacts colony development and size.[109]

Bumblebees are in danger in many developed countries due to habitat destruction and collateral pesticide damage. The European Food Safety Authority ruled that three neonicotinoid pesticides (clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) presented a high risk for bees.[110] While most work on neonicotinoid toxicity has looked at honeybees, a study on B. terrestris showed that "field-realistic" levels of imidacloprid significantly reduced growth rate and cut production of new queens by 85%, implying a "considerable negative effect" on wild bumblebee populations throughout the developed world.[111] However, in another study, following chronic exposure to field-realistic levels of the neonicotinoid pesticide thiamethoxam, colony weight gain was not affected, nor were the number or mass of sexuals produced.[112] Low levels of neonicotinoids can reduce the number of bumblebees in a colony by as much as 55%, and cause dysfunction in the bumblebees' brains. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust considers this evidence of reduced brain function "particularly alarming given that bumblebees rely upon their intelligence to go about their daily tasks."[113] A study on B. terrestris had results that suggests that use of neonicotinoid pesticides can affect how well bumblebees are able to forage and pollinate. Bee colonies that had been affected by the pesticide released more foragers and collected more pollen than bees who had not been dosed with neonicotinoid.[114] Although the bees affected by the pesticide were able to collect more pollen, they took a longer amount of time doing so.[115]

Of 19 species of native nestmaking bumblebees and six species of cuckoo bumblebees formerly widespread in Britain,[116] three have been extirpated,[117][118] eight are in serious decline, and only six remain widespread.[119] Similar declines have been reported in Ireland, with four species designated endangered, and another two considered vulnerable to extinction.[120] A decline in bumblebee numbers could cause large-scale changes to the countryside, resulting from inadequate pollination of certain plants.[121]

Some bumblebees native to North America are also vanishing, such as Bombus balteatus,[122] Bombus terricola,[123] Bombus affinis,[124][125] and Bombus occidentalis, and one, Bombus franklini, may be extinct.[126] In South America, Bombus bellicosus was extirpated in the northern limit of its distribution range, probably due to intense land use and climate change effects.[127]

Conservation efforts

Drone short-haired bumblebee, Bombus subterraneus. The species was successfully reintroduced to England from Sweden.
In 2006 the bumblebee researcher Dave Goulson founded a registered charity, the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, to prevent the extinction "of any of the UK's bumblebees."[128][129] In 2009 and 2010, the Trust attempted to reintroduce the short-haired bumblebee, Bombus subterraneus, which had become extinct in Britain, from the British-derived populations surviving in New Zealand from their introduction there a century earlier.[130] From 2011 the Trust, in partnership with Natural England, Hymettus and the RSPB, has reintroduced short-haired bumblebee queens from Skåne in southern Sweden to restored flower-rich meadows at Dungeness in Kent. The queens were checked for mites and American foulbrood disease. Agri-environment schemes spread across the neighbouring area of Romney Marsh have been set up to provide over 800 hectares of additional flower-rich habitat for the bees. By the summer of 2013, workers of the species were found near the release zone, proving that nests had been established. The restored habitat has produced a revival in at least five "Schedule 41 priority" species: the ruderal bumblebee, Bombus ruderatus; the red-shanked carder bee, Bombus ruderarius; the shrill carder bee, Bombus sylvarum; the brown-banded carder bee, Bombus humilis and the moss carder bee, Bombus muscorum.[131]

The world's first bumblebee sanctuary was established at Vane Farm in the Loch Leven National Nature Reserve in Scotland in 2008.[121] In 2011, London's Natural History Museum led the establishment of an International Union for Conservation of Nature Bumblebee Specialist Group, chaired by Dr. Paul H. Williams,[132] to assess the threat status of bumblebee species worldwide using Red List criteria.[133]

Bumblebee conservation is in its infancy in many parts of the world, but with the realization of the important part they play in pollination of crops, efforts are being made to manage farmland better. Enhancing the wild bee population can be done by the planting of wildflower strips, and in New Zealand, bee nesting boxes have achieved some success, perhaps because there are few burrowing mammals to provide potential nesting sites in that country.[106]

Misconception about flight

A bumblebee landing on a purple flower
A widely believed falsehood holds that scientists proved bumblebees to be incapable of flight.[134]
Further information: Insect flight
According to 20th-century folklore, the laws of aerodynamics prove the bumblebee should be incapable of flight, as it does not have the capacity (in terms of wing size or beats per second) to achieve flight with the degree of wing loading necessary.[135]

'Supposedly someone did a back of the envelope calculation, taking the weight of a bumblebee and its wing area into account, and worked out that if it only flies at a couple of metres per second, the wings wouldn't produce enough lift to hold the bee up,' explains Charlie Ellington, Professor of Animal Mechanics at Cambridge University.[135]
The origin of this claim has been difficult to pin down with any certainty. John H. McMasters recounted an anecdote about an unnamed Swiss aerodynamicist at a dinner party who performed some rough calculations and concluded, presumably in jest, that according to the equations, bumblebees cannot fly.[136] In later years, McMasters backed away from this origin, suggesting there could be multiple sources, and the earliest he has found was a reference in the 1934 book Le Vol des Insectes by French entomologist Antoine Magnan (1881–1938); they had applied the equations of air resistance to insects and found their flight was impossible, but "One shouldn't be surprised that the results of the calculations don't square with reality".[137]

The following passage appears in the introduction to Le Vol des Insectes:[138]

Tout d'abord poussé par ce qui se fait en aviation, j'ai appliqué aux insectes les lois de la résistance de l'air, et je suis arrivé avec M. Sainte-Laguë à cette conclusion que leur vol est impossible.

First prompted by what is done in aviation, I applied the laws of air resistance to insects, and I arrived, with Mr. Sainte-Laguë, at this conclusion that their flight is impossible.

Magnan refers to his assistant André Sainte-Laguë.[139] Some credit physicist Ludwig Prandtl (1875–1953) of the University of Göttingen in Germany with popularizing the idea. Others say Swiss gas dynamicist Jakob Ackeret (1898–1981) did the calculations.[140]


Bumblebee in flight. It has its tongue extended and a laden pollen basket.
The calculations that purported to show that bumblebees cannot fly are based upon a simplified linear treatment of oscillating aerofoils. The method assumes small amplitude oscillations without flow separation. This ignores the effect of dynamic stall (an airflow separation inducing a large vortex above the wing), which briefly produces several times the lift of the aerofoil in regular flight. More sophisticated aerodynamic analysis shows the bumblebee can fly because its wings encounter dynamic stall in every oscillation cycle.[141]

Additionally, John Maynard Smith, a noted biologist with a strong background in aeronautics, has pointed out that bumblebees would not be expected to sustain flight, as they would need to generate too much power given their tiny wing area. However, in aerodynamics experiments with other insects, he found that viscosity at the scale of small insects meant even their small wings can move a very large volume of air relative to their size, and this reduces the power required to sustain flight by an order of magnitude.[142]

In music and literature

Flight of the Bumblebee (1:19)

0:00

Flight of the Bumblebee performed by the US Army Band
Problems playing this file? See media help.

The Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov wrote the Flight of the Bumblebee, c. 1900
The orchestral interlude Flight of the Bumblebee was composed (c. 1900) by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. It represents the turning of Prince Guidon into a bumblebee so he can fly away to visit his father, Tsar Saltan, in the opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan,[143] although the music may reflect the flight of a bluebottle rather than a bumblebee.[144] The music inspired Walt Disney to feature a bumblebee in his 1940 animated musical Fantasia and have it sound as if it were flying in all parts of the theater.[145] This early attempt at "surround sound" was excluded from the film in later showings.

In 1599, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, someone, possibly Tailboys Dymoke, published Caltha Poetarum: Or The Bumble Bee, under the pseudonym "T. Cutwode".[146] This was one of nine books censored under the Bishop's Ban issued by the Archbishop of Canterbury John Whitgift and the Bishop of London Richard Bancroft.[147]


Emily Dickinson wrote "The Bumble-Bee's Religion" (1881)
Emily Dickinson made a bumblebee the subject of her parody of Isaac Watts's well-known poem about honeybees, "How Doth the Little Busy Bee" (1715). Where Watts wrote "How skilfully she builds her cell! How neat she spreads the wax!",[148] Dickinson's poem, "The Bumble-Bee's Religion" (1881), begins "His little Hearse-like Figure / Unto itself a Dirge / To a delusive Lilac / The vanity divulge / Of Industry and Morals / And every righteous thing / For the divine Perdition / of Idleness and Spring." The letter was said to have enclosed a dead bee.[149][150]

In 1847, Ralph Waldo Emerson published his poem "The Humble-Bee".

The entomologist Otto Plath wrote Bumblebees and Their Ways in 1934.[151] His daughter, the poet Sylvia Plath, wrote a group of poems about bees late in 1962, within four months of her suicide,[152] transforming her father's interest into her poetry.[153]


Bumblebees of different species illustrated by Moses Harris in his 1782 Exposition of English Insects
The scientist and illustrator Moses Harris (1731–1785) painted accurate watercolour drawings of bumblebees in his An Exposition of English Insects Including the Several Classes of Neuroptera, Hymenoptera, & Diptera, or Bees, Flies, & Libellulae (1776–80).[154]

Bumblebees appear as characters, often eponymously, in children's books. The surname Dumbledore in the Harry Potter series (1997–2007) is an old name for bumblebee.[7] J. K. Rowling said the name "seemed to suit the headmaster, because one of his passions is music and I imagined him walking around humming to himself".[155] J. R. R. Tolkien, in his poem Errantry, also used the name Dumbledor, but for a large bee-like creature.

Among the many books for younger children are Bumble the Bee by Yvon Douran and Tony Neal (2014); Bertie Bumble Bee by K. I. Al-Ghani (2012); Ben the Bumble Bee: How do bees make honey? by Romessa Awadalla (2015); Bumble Bee Bob Has a Big Butt by Papa Campbell (2012); Buzz, Buzz, Buzz! Went Bumble-bee by Colin West (1997); Bumble Bee by Margaret Wise Brown (2000); How the Bumble Came to Bee by Paul and Ella Quarry (2012); The Adventures of Professor Bumble and the Bumble Bees by Stephen Brailovsky (2010). Among Beatrix Potter's "little books", Babbity Bumble and other members of her nest appear in The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse (1910).

Military
The United States Naval Construction Battalions adopted the bumblebee as their insignia in 1942.[citation needed]

Edited by: SD_ECBS BEN - Jun-27-22 11:40:00

SD_ECBS BEN
FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO
useravatar
Offline
13871 Posts
Male  Website 
Administrator has disabled public posting. Please login or register in order to proceed.

Re: HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES




See also
Ophrys bombyliflora, the bumblebee orchid
Notes
^ The study location was the Botanical Garden Halle (Saale) in Germany, described as a flower-rich region with high and stable abundance of both host and cuckoo species. 24 B. terrestris workers and 24 drones were captured on foraging flights. 24 male B. vestalis were similarly captured. DNA analysis was used to estimate how many colonies these individuals came from.[79]
References
^ Brown, Lesley; Stevenson, Angus (2007). Shorter Oxford English dictionary on historical principles. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press. p. 309. ISBN 978-0-19-923325-0.
^ Wedgwood, Hensleigh (1855). "On False Etymologies". Transactions of the Philological Society (6): 67.
^ "bumble-bee, n". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 29 May 2011.
^ "humble-bee, n". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 29 May 2011.
^ Shakespeare, William (1 July 2000). A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare – Project Gutenberg. Gutenberg.org.
^ "WikiLing – ahd". koeblergerhard.de. Retrieved 2 April 2019.
^ Jump up to: a b "Dumbledor". Merriam–Webster. 1913. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015.
^ Darwin, Charles (1 March 1998). On the Origin of Species By Means of Natural Selection, or, the Preservation of – Project Gutenberg. Gutenberg.org.
^ Jones, Richard (1 August 2010). "How the humblebee became the bumblebee". The Guardian. London.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Cardinal, Sophie; Danforth, Bryan N. (June 2011). "The Antiquity and Evolutionary History of Social Behavior in Bees". PLOS ONE. 6 (6): e21086. Bibcode:2011PLoSO...621086C. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021086. PMC 3113908. PMID 21695157.
^ Romiguier, J.; Cameron, S.A.; Woodard, S.H.; Fischman, B.J.; Keller, L.; Praz, C.J. (2015). "Phylogenomics controlling for base compositional bias reveals a single origin of eusociality in corbiculate bees". Molecular Biology and Evolution. 33 (3): 670–678. doi:10.1093/molbev/msv258. PMID 26576851.
^ "†Oligobombus Antropov 2014 (bee)". FossilWorks. Retrieved 17 December 2021.
^ Antropov, A. V.; et al. (2014). "The wasps, bees and ants (Insecta: Vespida=Hymenoptera) from the Insect Limestone (Late Eocene) of the Isle of Wight" (PDF). Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. 104 (3–4): 335–446. doi:10.1017/S1755691014000103. S2CID 85699800.
^ Jump up to: a b Wappler, Torsten; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Aytekin, A. Murat; Michez, Denis; Engel, Michael S. (2012). "Geometric morphometric analysis of a new Miocene bumble bee from the Randeck Maar of southwestern Germany (Hymenoptera: Apidae)". Systematic Entomology. 37 (4): 784–792. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3113.2012.00642.x. S2CID 84979697.[permanent dead link]
^ Jump up to: a b Dehon, M.; Engel, M.; Gérard, M.; Aytekin, A.; Ghisbain, G.; Williams, P.; Rasmont, P.; Michez, D. (2019). "Morphometric analysis of fossil bumble bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombini) reveals their taxonomic affinities". ZooKeys (891): 71–118. doi:10.3897/zookeys.891.36027. PMC 6882928. PMID 31802973.
^ Dehon, Manuel; Michez, Denis; Nel, Andre; Engel, Michael S.; De Meulemeester, Thibaut (2014). "Wing Shape of Four New Bee Fossils (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) Provides Insights to Bee Evolution". PLOS ONE. 9 (10): e108865. Bibcode:2014PLoSO...9j8865D. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0108865. PMC 4212905. PMID 25354170.
^ Prokop, J.; Dehon, M.; Michez, D.; Engel, M. S. (2017). "An Early Miocene bumble bee from northern Bohemia (Hymenoptera, Apidae)". ZooKeys (710): 43–63. doi:10.3897/zookeys.710.14714. PMC 5674177. PMID 29118643.
^ Williams, Paul H. (1998). "An annotated checklist of bumble bees with an analysis of patterns of description". Bulletin of the Natural History Museum, Entomology Series. 67: 79–152. Retrieved 30 May 2012.
^ Jump up to: a b Williams, Paul; Cameron, Sydney A.; Hines, Heather M.; Cederberg, Bjorn; Rasmont, Pierre (2008). "A simplified subgeneric classification of the bumblebees (genus Bombus)" (PDF). Apidologie. 39: 46–74. doi:10.1051/apido:2007052. S2CID 3489618.
^ "The differences between bumblebees and honeybees". Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Archived from the original on 28 February 2015. Retrieved 23 February 2015.
^ Wild, Alex (11 October 2011). "How to tell the difference between honey bees and bumble bees". Myrmecos. Archived from the original on 23 February 2015. Retrieved 23 February 2015.
^ "Bumblebee species". Bumblebee.org. Retrieved 23 February 2015.
^ Johnston, Ian (6 July 2014). "Bye bye big bee: In South America, the world's largest bumblebee is at risk from imported rivals". The Independent.
^ "Map at: Bumblebees of the world". Natural History Museum. Retrieved 9 July 2007.
^ Milliron, H. E.; Oliver, D. R. (1966). "Bumblebees from northern Ellesmere Island, with observations on usurpation by Megabombus hyperboreus (Schönh.)". Canadian Entomologist. 98 (2): 207–213. doi:10.4039/Ent98207-2.
^ Jump up to: a b Heinrich, B. (1981). Insect Thermoregulation. Krieger Publishing Company. ISBN 978-0-471-05144-2.
^ Dillon, Michael E; Dudley, Robert (February 2014). "Surpassing Mt. Everest: extreme flight performance of alpine bumble-bees". Biology Letters. 10 (2): 20130922. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2013.0922. PMC 3949368. PMID 24501268.
^ "Genus Bombus – Bumble Bees". BugGuide.Net. Retrieved 12 February 2015.
^ Harder, L.D. (1986). "Effects of nectar concentration and flower depth on flower handling efficiency of bumble bees". Oecologia. 69 (2): 309–315. Bibcode:1986Oecol..69..309H. doi:10.1007/BF00377639. PMID 28311376. S2CID 30088277.
^ Heinrich, Bernd (2004). Bumblebee Economics. Harvard University Press. p. 152. ISBN 978-0-674-01639-2.
^ Newman, Daniel A.; Thomson, James D.; Ranta, Esa (2005). "Effects of nectar robbing on nectar dynamics and bumblebee foraging strategies in Linaria vulgaris (Scrophulariaceae)". Okies. 10 (2): 309–320. doi:10.1111/j.0030-1299.2005.13884.x. JSTOR 3548471.
^ Jump up to: a b "The bumblebee body". Bumblebee.org. Retrieved 12 February 2015.
^ Williams, Paul H. (2007). "The distribution of bumblebee colour patterns world-wide: possible significance for thermoregulation, crypsis, and warning mimicry". Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 92 (1): 97–118. doi:10.1111/j.1095-8312.2007.00878.x.
^ Jump up to: a b Thorp, Robbin W.; Horning, Donald S.; Dunning, Lorry L. (1983). Bumble Bees and Cuckoo Bumble Bees of California (Hymenoptera, Apidae). University of California Press. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-520-09645-5.
^ Williams, Paul H. (2008). "Do the parasitic Psithyrus resemble their host bumblebees in colour pattern?" (PDF). Apidologie. 39 (6): 637–649. doi:10.1051/apido:2008048. S2CID 27702692.
^ Jump up to: a b Macdonald, 2003. p. 6
^ Peat, J.; Darvill, B.; Ellis, J.; Goulson, D. (2005). "Effects of climate on intra- and interspecific size variation in bumble-bees". Functional Ecology. 19: 145–151. doi:10.1111/j.0269-8463.2005.00946.x.
^ "Bumblebee wings". Bumblebee.org. Retrieved 14 February 2015.
^ Goller, Franz; Esch, Harald (May 1990). "Comparative Study of Chill-Coma Temperatures and Muscle Potentials in Insect Flight Muscles". Journal of Experimental Biology. 150 (1): 221–231. doi:10.1242/jeb.150.1.221.
^ Dornhaus, Anna; Chittka, Lars (2001). "Food alert in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris): possible mechanisms and evolutionary implications". Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 50 (6): 570–576. doi:10.1007/s002650100395. S2CID 46168842.
^ Dornhaus, Anna; Chittka, Lars (2005). "Bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) store both food and information in honeypots". Behavioral Ecology. 16 (3): 661–666. doi:10.1093/beheco/ari040.
^ Loukola, Olli J.; Perry, Clint J.; Coscos, Louie; Chittka, Lars (24 February 2017). "Bumblebees show cognitive flexibility by improving on an observed complex behavior". Science. 355 (6327): 833–836. Bibcode:2017Sci...355..833L. doi:10.1126/science.aag2360. PMID 28232576. S2CID 206651162.
^ Watson, Traci (2017). "Bees learn football from their buddies". Nature News. doi:10.1038/nature.2017.21540. S2CID 152110899.
^ Jump up to: a b "Bumblebee nests". Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Archived from the original on 22 September 2017. Retrieved 13 February 2015.
^ Cueva del Castillo, R; Sanabria-Urbán, S.; Serrano-Meneses, M. A. (2015). "Trade-offs in the evolution of bumblebee colony and body size: a comparative analysis". Ecology and Evolution. 5 (18): 3914–3926. doi:10.1002/ece3.1659. PMC 4588658. PMID 26445652.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Goulson, 2013. pp. 16–24
^ Lye, Gillian C.; Osborne, Juliet L.; Park, Kirsty J.; Goulson, Dave (November 2011). "Using citizen science to monitor Bombus populations in the UK: nesting ecology and relative abundance in the urban environment". Journal of Insect Conservation. 16 (5): 697–707. doi:10.1007/s10841-011-9450-3. S2CID 3956485.
^ "The Bumblebee Lifecycle". Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Retrieved 11 February 2015.
^ "Bombus pensylvanicus". University of Wisconsin La Crosse. 2013.
^ Juan Di Trani de la Hoz (2006). "Phenology of Bombus pennsylvanicus sonorus Say (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in Central Mexico". Neotropical Entomology. 35 (5): 588–95. doi:10.1590/S1519-566X2006000500004. PMID 17144129.
^ 'Nest of the Common Humble-Bee (B. terrestris)', Plate 15 from The Naturalist's Library, Vol. VI. Entomology, by Sir William Jardine. Edinburgh: W. H. Lizars, 1840
^ Jump up to: a b "Biology". Biobees Bumblebee Pollination. Archived from the original on 13 February 2015. Retrieved 13 February 2015.
^ Evans, Elaine; Burns, Ian; Spivak, Marla (2007). Befriending Bumble Bees. St. Paul: University of Minnesota Press.
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 108–114
^ Van Honk, C. G. J.; Velthuis, H. H. W.; Röseler, P.-F.; Malotaux, M. E. (1980). "The mandibular glands of Bombus terrestris queens as a source of queen pheromones". Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata. 28 (2): 191–198. doi:10.1007/BF00287128.
^ Jump up to: a b Zanette, L. R.; Miller, S. D.; Faria, C. M.; Almond, E. J.; Huggins, T. J.; Jordan, W. C.; Bourke, A. F. (December 2012). "Reproductive conflict in bumblebees and the evolution of worker policing". Evolution. 66 (12): 3765–3777. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2012.01709.x. PMID 23206135. S2CID 36787898.
^ Fletcher, D. J. C.; Fletcher, Ross K. (1985). "Regulation of reproduction in eusocial Hymenoptera". Annual Review of Entomology. 30: 319–343. doi:10.1146/annurev.en.30.010185.001535.
^ Cameron, S.D (1998). "Mediators of dominance and reproductive success among queens in the cyclically polygynous neotropical bumble bee Bombus atratus Franklin" (PDF). Insectes Sociaux. 45 (2): 135–149. doi:10.1007/s000400050075. S2CID 11849676.
^ Walther-Hellwig, K.; Frankl, R. (2000). "Foraging distances of Bombus muscorum, Bombus lapidarius, and Bombus terrestris (Hymenoptera, Apidae)". Journal of Insect Behavior. 13 (2): 239–246. doi:10.1023/A:1007740315207. S2CID 29303814.
^ Dramstad, W. E.; Fry, G. L. A.; Schaffer, M. J. (2003). "Bumblebee foraging—is closer really better?". Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment. 95 (1): 349–357. doi:10.1016/S0167-8809(02)00043-9.
^ Osborne, J. L.; Clark, S. J.; Morris, R. J.; Williams, I. H.; Riley, J. R.; Smith, A. D.; Reynolds, D. R.; Edwards, A. S. (1999). "A landscape-scale study of bumble bee foraging range and constancy, using harmonic radar". Journal of Applied Ecology. 36 (4): 519–533. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2664.1999.00428.x.
^ Blackawton, P. S.; Airzee, S.; Allen, A.; Baker, S.; Berrow, A.; Blair, C.; Churchill, M.; Coles R. F.-J.; Cumming, L.; et al. (2010). Fraquelli, C. Hackford, A. Hinton Mellor, M. Hutchcroft, B. Ireland, J.; Jewsbury, D.; Littlejohns, A.; Littlejohns, G. M.; Lotto, M.; McKeown, J.; O'Toole, A.; Richards, H.; Robbins-Davey, L.; Roblyn, S.; Rodwell-Lynn, H.; Schenck, D.; Springer, J.; Wishy, A.; Rodwell-Lynn, T.; Strudwick, D.; Lotto, R. B. "Blackawton bees". Biology Letters. 7 (2): 168–72. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2010.1056. PMC 3061190. PMID 21177694.
^ Clarke, D.; Whitney, H.; Sutton, G.; Robert, D. (2013). "Detection and Learning of Floral Electric Fields by Bumblebees". Science. 340 (6128): 66–9. Bibcode:2013Sci...340...66C. doi:10.1126/science.1230883. PMID 23429701. S2CID 23742599.
Matt Kaplan (21 February 2013). "Bumblebees sense electric fields in flowers". Nature. doi:10.1038/nature.2013.12480.
^ Whitney, H.; Dyer, A.; Rands, S.A.; Glover, B.J. (2008). "The interaction of temperature and sucrose concentration on foraging preferences in bumblebees". Naturwissenschaften. 95 (9): 845–850. Bibcode:2008NW.....95..845W. doi:10.1007/s00114-008-0393-9. PMID 18523748. S2CID 939116.
^ Harrap, M.J.M.; Rands, S.A.; Hempel de Ibarra, N.; Whitney, H.M. (2017). "The diversity of floral temperature patterns, and their use by pollinators". eLife. 6. doi:10.7554/eLife.31262. PMC 5736352. PMID 29254518.
^ Maloof, J. E. (2001). "The effects of a bumble bee nectar robber on plant reproductive success and pollinator behavior". American Journal of Botany. 88 (11): 1960–1965. doi:10.2307/3558423. JSTOR 3558423. PMID 21669629. S2CID 33897983.
^ "Bumblebee legs". Bumblebee.org. Retrieved 18 February 2015.
^ Leonard, Anne. "Buzz Pollination". Retrieved 11 February 2015.
^ Goulson, Dave; Hawson, Sadie A.; Stout, Jane C. (1998). "Foraging bumblebees avoid flowers already visited by conspecifics or by other bumblebee species". Animal Behaviour. 55 (1): 199–206. doi:10.1006/anbe.1997.0570. PMID 9480686. S2CID 2969977.
^ Saleh, Nehal; Scott, Alan G.; Bryning, Gareth P. & Chittka, Lars (2007). "Bumblebees use incidental footprints to generate adaptive behaviour at flowers and nest". Arthropod-Plant Interactions. 1 (2): 119–127. doi:10.1007/s11829-007-9011-6. S2CID 40995470.
^ Saleh, Nehal; Chittka, Lars (2006). "The importance of experience in the interpretation of conspecific chemical signals". Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 61 (2): 215–220. doi:10.1007/s00265-006-0252-7. S2CID 2052108.
^ Pearce, Richard F.; Giuggioli, Luca; Rands, Sean A. (2017). "Bumblebees can discriminate between scent-marks deposited by conspecifics". Scientific Reports. 7: 43872. Bibcode:2017NatSR...743872P. doi:10.1038/srep43872. PMC 5339730. PMID 28266572.
^ Saleh, Nehal; Ohashi, Kazuharu; Thomson, James D. & Chittka, Lars (2006). "Facultative use of repellent scent mark in foraging bumblebees: complex versus simple flowers". Animal Behaviour. 71 (4): 847–854. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2005.06.014. S2CID 53167932.
^ Comba, Livio; Sarah Corbet. "Living larders for bumblebees". Natural History Museum. Retrieved 20 June 2010.
^ Macdonald, 2003. p. 7
^ Jump up to: a b Scherer, C.W. "Fastest Wing Beat". Book of Insect Records. University of Florida. Retrieved 29 October 2015.
^ "Definition of Asynchronous muscle in the Entomologists' glossary". Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University. Retrieved 19 April 2013.
^ Schmidt-Nielsen, Knut (10 April 1997). Animal Physiology: Adaptation and Environment. Cambridge University Press. pp. 290–291. ISBN 978-0-521-57098-5.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Erler, S.; Lattorff, H. M. G. (2010). "The degree of parasitism of the bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) by cuckoo bumblebees (Bombus (Psithyrus) vestalis)". Insectes Sociaux. 57 (4): 371–377. doi:10.1007/s00040-010-0093-2. S2CID 853556.
^ Peter J.B. Slater; Jay S. Rosenblatt; Charles T. Snowdon; Timothy J. Roper; H. Jane Brockmann; Marc Naguib (30 January 2005). Advances in the Study of Behavior. Academic Press. p. 365. ISBN 978-0-08-049015-1.
^ Pierre Rasmont. "Bombus (Psithyrus) sylvestris (Lepeletier, 1832)". Université de Mons. Retrieved 6 January 2013.
^ Zimma, B. O.; Ayasse, M.; Tengo, J.; Ibarra, F.; Schulz, C. & Francke, W. (2003). "Do social parasitic bumblebees use chemical weapons? (Hymenoptera, Apidae)". Journal of Comparative Physiology A. 189 (10): 769–775. doi:10.1007/s00359-003-0451-x. PMID 12955437. S2CID 24441556.
^ Fisher, R.M. (December 1988). "Observations on the Behaviors of Three European Cuckoo Bumble Bee Species (Psithyrus)". Insectes Sociaux. 35 (4): 341–354. doi:10.1007/BF02225810. S2CID 24071728.
^ Fisher, R. M.; Sampson, B. J. (1992). "Morphological specializations of the bumble bee social parasite Psithyrus ashtoni (Cresson) (Hymenoptera, Apidae)". Canadian Entomologist. 124 (1): 69–77. doi:10.4039/Ent12469-1.
^ Macdonald, 2003. p. 12
^ "Do bumblebees sting? Once or many times?". Straight Dope. Archived from the original on 30 December 2007. Retrieved 9 July 2007.
^ "Bee Stings, BeeSpotter, University of Illinois". Beespotter.mste.illinois.edu. Retrieved 25 May 2012.
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 118–121
^ Goulson, 2013. p. 132
^ Goulson, 2013. p. 126
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 126–129
^ Cramp, Stanley; et al. (1993). Handbook of the Birds of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. Volume VII: Flycatchers to Shrikes. Oxford: RSPB / Oxford University Press. p. 505. ISBN 978-0-198-57510-8.
^ "Honey Buzzard: Feeding". Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
^ "Parasites fail to halt European bumblebee invasion of the UK Archived 10 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine", Bumblebee Conservation Trust (retrieved 6 February 2015)
^ "New study shows how bumblebees can be infected by honeybee diseases Archived 4 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine", Bumblebee Conservation Trust (retrieved 6 February 2015)
^ Gambino, Parker (1995). "Dolichovespula (Hymenoptera: Vespidae), Hosts of Aphomia sociella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)". Journal of the New York Entomological Society. 103 (2): 165–169. JSTOR 25010152.
^ "Modelling bee pollination: enter the 'flight arena'". Global Food Security. Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. Retrieved 11 February 2015.
^ "NRDC: OnEarth Magazine, Summer 2006 – The Vanishing". Retrieved 9 July 2007.
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 169–170
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 69–70
^ Inoue, Maki N.; Yokoyama, Jun; Washitani, Izumi (2007). "Displacement of Japanese native bumblebees by the recently introduced Bombus terrestris (L.) (Hymenoptera: Apidae)". Journal of Insect Conservation. 12 (2): 135–146. doi:10.1007/s10841-007-9071-z. S2CID 33992235.
^ Esterio, Gabriel; Cares-Suárez, Roxana; González-Browne, Catalina; Salinas, Patricia; Carvallo, Gastón; Medel, Rodrigo (2013). "Assessing the impact of the invasive buff-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) on the pollination of the native Chilean herb Mimulus luteus". Arthropod-Plant Interactions. 7 (4): 467–474. doi:10.1007/s11829-013-9264-1. hdl:10533/128436. S2CID 2212551.
^ Shao, Z.-Y.; Mao, H.-X.; Fu, W.-J.; Ono, M.; Wang, D.-S.; Bonizzoni, M.; Zhang, Y.-P. (January 2004). "Genetic Structure of Asian Populations of Bombus ignitus (Hymenoptera: Apidae)". Journal of Heredity. 95 (1): 46–52. doi:10.1093/jhered/esh008. PMID 14757729.
^ Colla, Sheila R.; Otterstatter, Michael C.; Gegear, Robert J.; Thomson, James D. (2006). "Plight of the bumble bee: Pathogen spillover from commercial to wild populations". Biological Conservation. 129 (4): 461–467. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2005.11.013.
^ Jump up to: a b Graystock, Peter; Yates, Kathryn; Evison, Sophie E. F.; Darvill, Ben; Goulson, Dave; Hughes, William O. H. (2013). Osborne, Juliet (ed.). "The Trojan hives: Pollinator pathogens, imported and distributed in bumblebee colonies". Journal of Applied Ecology. 50 (5): 1207–1215. doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12134.
Victoria Gill (18 July 2013). "Imported bumblebees pose 'parasite threat' to native bees". BBC News.
^ Jump up to: a b Goulson, 2013. pp. 169–172
^ Williams, Paul H.; Osborne, Juliet L. (2009). "Bumblebee vulnerability and conservation world-wide" (PDF). Apidologie. 40 (3): 367–387. doi:10.1051/apido/2009025. S2CID 37080850.
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 4–6
^ Lipa, JJ; Triggiani, O. (1992). "A newly recorded neogregarine (Protozoa, Apicomplexa), parasite in honey bees (Apis mellifera) and bumble bees (Bombus spp.)" (PDF). Adipologie. 23 (6): 533–536. doi:10.1051/apido:19920605.
^ Foucart, Stéphane (16 January 2013). "Pesticides: un risque enfin admis pour les abeilles". Le Monde.
^ Whitehorn, Penelope R.; O'Connor, Stephanie; Wackers, Felix L.; Goulson, Dave (20 April 2012). "Neonicotinoid pesticide reduces bumble bee colony growth and queen production". Science. 336 (6079): 351–352. Bibcode:2012Sci...336..351W. doi:10.1126/science.1215025. PMID 22461500. S2CID 2738787.
^ Stanley, Dara A.; Raine, Nigel E. (2017). "Bumblebee colony development following chronic exposure to field-realistic levels of the neonicotinoid pesticide thiamethoxam under laboratory conditions". Scientific Reports. 7 (1): 8005. Bibcode:2017NatSR...7.8005S. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-08752-x. PMC 5556064. PMID 28808317.
^ "Bumblebee brains affected by neonicotinoids". Bumblebee Conservation Trust. 3 February 2014. Archived from the original on 19 February 2015. New research has emerged from the Universities of Dundee and St. Andrews which shows that accepted environmental levels of neonicotinoids impair bumblebee brain functionality and consequently negatively impact the performance of whole colonies. Research was published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology by Chris Connolly and others.
^ Stanley, Dara (14 March 2016). "Chronic exposure to a neonicotinoid pesticide alters the interactions between bumblebees and wild plants". Functional Ecology. 30 (7): 1132–1139. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12644. PMC 4950133. PMID 27512241.
^ Hazen, Shelley (15 March 2016). "Pesticides Damage Bumblebees' Pollinating Skills – And That Spells Trouble For Our Food". Inquistr.
^ Kaae, Richard (nd). "Bees, Wasps and Ants". Insect & Civilization Part 2. Archived from the original on 24 December 2013. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
^ University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (28 July 2006). "Scientists map the flight of the bumblebee". Science Daily.
^ Harman, Alan (July 2003). "Bumblebee Shortage". Bee Culture. 59.
^ Williams, Paul H. (1986). "Environmental change and the distributions of British bumble bees (Bombus Latr.)". Bee World. 67 (2): 50–61. doi:10.1080/0005772x.1986.11098871.
^ Fitzpatrick, U.; Murray, T. E.; Byrne, A.; Paxton, R. J.; Brown, M. J. F. (2006). "Regional red list of Irish Bees" (PDF). Report to National Parks and Wildlife Service (Ireland) and Environment and Heritage Service (N. Ireland).[dead link]
^ Jump up to: a b "World's first bumblebee sanctuary creates a buzz". Geographical. 80 (10): 8. 2008.
^ Miller-Struttmann, Nicole E.; Geib, Jennifer C.; Franklin, James D.; Kevan, Peter G.; Holdo, Ricardo M.; Ebert-May, Diane; Lynn, Austin M.; Kettenbach, Jessica A.; Hedrick, Elizabeth (25 September 2015). "Functional mismatch in a bumble bee pollination mutualism under climate change". Science. 349 (6255): 1541–1544. Bibcode:2015Sci...349.1541M. doi:10.1126/science.aab0868. PMID 26404836. S2CID 46616411.
^ Wong, Lisa; Cameron, Sydney; Favret, Colin; Jennifer, Grixti (2009). "Decline of bumble bees (Bombus) in the North American Midwest". Biological Conservation. 142: 75–84. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2008.09.027.
^ Flesher, Lohn (10 January 2017). "Rusty Patched Bumblebee Declared Endangered". ABC News. APNews.
^ "Fact Sheet Rusty Patched Bumble Bee (Bombus affinis)". Endangered Species. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Retrieved 10 January 2017.
^ "Bumble Bee Conservation". The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. Retrieved 20 June 2010.
^ Martins, Aline C.; Melo, Gabriel A. R. (2009). "Has the bumblebee Bombus bellicosus gone extinct in the northern portion of its distribution range in Brazil?". Journal of Insect Conservation. 14 (2): 207–210. doi:10.1007/s10841-009-9237-y. S2CID 31976881.
^ "About us". Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Retrieved 10 May 2014.
^ Barkham, Patrick. "A Sting in the Tale by Dave Goulson – review". The Guardian. No. 18 May 2013. Retrieved 26 June 2014.
^ Goulson, 2013. pp. 1–14, 227–241
^ "The Short-haired bumblebee reintroduction". Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Archived from the original on 16 February 2015. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
^ "Bumblebee Specialist Group". Natural History Museum. London. Archived from the original on 4 January 2014. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
^ "2011 Update" (PDF). IUCN. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 December 2012. Retrieved 7 October 2012.
^ Ivars Peterson (11 September 2004). "Flight of the Bumblebee". Science News. "the venerable line about scientists having proved that a bumblebee can't fly appears regularly in magazine and newspaper stories. It's also the kind of item that can come up in a cocktail party conversation when the subject turns to science or technology. [...] Often, the statement is made in a distinctly disparaging tone aimed at putting down those know-it-all scientists and engineers who are so smart yet can't manage to understand something that's apparent to everyone else. [...] the story has had remarkable staying power, and the myth persists that science says a bumblebee can't fly. Indeed, this myth has taken on a new life of its own as a piece of "urban folklore" on the Internet."
^ Jump up to: a b "The secrets of bee flight". Archived from the original on 7 January 2015. Retrieved 12 February 2015.
^ McMasters, John H. (March–April 1989). "The flight of the bumblebee and related myths of entomological engineering". American Scientist. 77 (2): 146–169. Bibcode:1989AmSci..77..164M. cited in Jay Ingram (2001). The Barmaid's Brain. Aurum Press. pp. 91–92. ISBN 978-1-85410-633-9.
^ Jay Ingram (2001). The Barmaid's Brain. Aurum Press. pp. 91–92. ISBN 978-1-85410-633-9.
^ Magnan, Antoine (1934). Le Vol des Insectes. Hermann.
^ "The bumblebee story can be traced back to a 1934 book by entomologist Antoine Magnan, who refers to a calculation by his assistant André Sainte-Laguë, who was an engineer. The conclusion was presumably based on the fact that the maximum possible lift produced by aircraft wings as small as a bumblebee's wings and traveling as slowly as a bee in flight would be much less than the weight of a bee."Dickinson, M (2001). "Solving the mystery of insect flight". Scientific American. 284 (6): 48–57. Bibcode:2001SciAm.284f..48D. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0601-48. PMID 11396342.
^ "Bumblebees Can't Fly". Snopes. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
^ "Bumblebees finally cleared for takeoff". Cornell Chronicle. 20 March 2000.
^ John Maynard Smith. "Flight in Birds and Aeroplanes – Science Video". Retrieved 20 June 2010.
^ Maes, Francis (2002). A history of Russian music: from Kamarinskaya to Babi Yar. University of California Press. p. 191. ISBN 978-0-520-21815-4. Retrieved 3 April 2010.
^ Maconie, Robin (1997). The science of music. Oxford University Press. p. 184. ISBN 978-0-19-816648-1.
^ Holman, Tomlinson (2007). Surround sound: up and running. Focal Press. pp. 3–4. ISBN 978-0-240-80829-1.
^ "Caltha poetarum: or The bumble bee. Composed by T. Cutwode Esquyre". University of Michigan Libraries. Retrieved 11 February 2015.
^ "Caltha Poetarum". Banned Books. Archived from the original on 11 February 2015. Retrieved 11 February 2015.
^ Watts, Isaac (1715). "How Doth the Little Busy Bee". Poets.org. Retrieved 13 February 2015.
^ Morgan, Victoria N. (2010). Emily Dickinson and Hymn Culture: Tradition and Experience. Ashgate. pp. 183–184. ISBN 978-0-7546-6942-5.
^ Dickinson, Emily (1986). The Bumble-Bee's Religion, in a letter to Gilbert Dickinson, 1881. The Letters of Emily Dickinson. Harvard University Press. p. 712. ISBN 9780674526273.
^ Steinberg, Peter K. "Biography". SylviaPlath.info. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
^ "Sylvia Plath and the Bees". The County Dublin Beekeepers' Association. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
^ Kirk, Connie Ann (1 January 2004). Sylvia Plath: A Biography. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 14. ISBN 978-0-313-33214-2.
^ Exposition of English insects. WorldCat. 1782. OCLC 15094019.
^ Sexton, Colleen A. (1 October 2007). J. K. Rowling. Twenty-First Century Books. p. 46. ISBN 978-0-8225-7949-6.
Sources
Abbott, Carl, and Bartlett, John. "Bumble Bees". Encarta Encyclopedia. 2004 ed.
Anon. "Bees". World Book Encyclopedia, 1998 ed.
Benton, Ted. Bumblebees. New Naturalist Series (#98). Collins, 2006.
Freeman, Scott. Biological Science. Upper Saddle River, 2002.
Goulson, Dave. Bumblebees: Their Behaviour and Ecology, 2003. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-852607-5.
Goulson, Dave. A Sting in the Tale. Jonathan Cape, 2013.
Hasley, William D. "Bees". Collier's Encyclopedia, 1990 ed.
Macdonald, Murdo. Bumblebees. Scottish Natural Heritage, 2003.
Macdonald, Murdo & Nisbet, G. Highland Bumblebees: Distribution, Ecology and Conservation. HBRG, 2006. ISBN 0-9552211-0-2. – Supplement 2 (2007).
Michener, C.D. The Bees of the World. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000.
Schweitzer, Dale F. et al. Conservation and Management of North American Bumble Bees. Washington D.C.: U.S. Forest Service, 2012.
External links
    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bombus.
    Wikispecies has information related to Bombus.
    Wikibooks has a book on the topic of: Beekeeping/Plants_for_Bumblebees
Bumblebees of the world – find species by region, species groups, colour pattern, nhm.ac.uk
Bumblebee Conservation Trust
IUCN's Bumblebee Specialist Group
Bombus Identification Guide, Discover Life: List of Species, Worldwide Species Map.
Deciphering the Mystery of Bee Flight

Edited by: SD_ECBS BEN - Jun-27-22 11:39:15

SD_ECBS BEN
FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO
useravatar
Offline
13871 Posts
Male  Website 
Administrator has disabled public posting. Please login or register in order to proceed.

Re: HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES

004

SD_ECBS BEN
FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO
useravatar
Offline
13871 Posts
Male  Website 
Administrator has disabled public posting. Please login or register in order to proceed.

Re: HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES

005

SD_ECBS BEN
FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO
useravatar
Offline
13871 Posts
Male  Website 
Administrator has disabled public posting. Please login or register in order to proceed.

Re: HONOUR THE EXCELLENCE OF BUMBLE BEES

006

SD_ECBS BEN
FOUNDER & SD_ECBS CEO
useravatar
Offline
13871 Posts
Male  Website 
Administrator has disabled public posting. Please login or register in order to proceed.

Board Info

Board Stats
 
Total Topics:
491
Total Polls:
0
Total Posts:
13292
Posts this week:
1
User Info
 
Total Users:
5
Newest User:
mdsk
Members Online:
0
Guests Online:
368

Online: 
There are no members online